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    Curriculum

    The Doctor of Physical Therapy at LMU is a 36-month, full-time program that includes 34 weeks of full-time clinical internships. The curriculum will introduce new topics and concepts and emphasize and reinforce them at increasing levels of complexity throughout the program. The benefits of this approach to teaching include, but are not limited to:

    • The information is reinforced and solidified each time the student revisits the subject matter
    • The curriculum allows for a logical progression from simplistic to complicated ideas
    • Students are encouraged to apply early knowledge to later course objectives

     


    Year One - Summer

    •  DPT 701L - Clinical Functional Anatomy (6 credit hrs)

      This course focuses on the detailed structure and function of the human musculoskeletal and neuromuscular system and review fundamental embryology, histology, and gross anatomical structure. Laboratory sessions will allow students to acquire a three-dimensional appreciation of anatomical structure through instructor-guided human cadaver dissection and study of models and prosections.

    •  *PRS 185 - Seminar in Allied Health Professions I (1 credit hr)

      Students will be introduced to the history of physical therapy profession, scope of practice, professional organizations, roles of other health care professionals, and the importance of scientific research and its link to the concept of evidence-based practice. Concepts related to managed care and the changing healthcare environment will be explored as they relate to the health care professional and consumer.

    •  *PRS 285 - Seminar in Allied Health Professions II (1 credit hr)

      Topics will include principles of therapeutic communication, ethics and core values, sociocultural issues and cultural fluency in health care delivery, issues in professional continuing education in a dynamic profession, computer literacy in physical therapy, an introduction to rehabilitation science medical terminology and documentation formats.

    •   *PRS 385 - Seminar in Allied Health Professions III (1 credit hr)
       

      This course will focus on the principles of teaching and learning relevant to the role of the allied health professional as an educator addressing the changing needs of the learner across the lifespan. Topics will include theoretical models of adult learning styles, learning theories, cognitive development, and taxonomies of educational objectives. Students will learn the importance of the assessment of the learner's needs across the lifespan as well as contextual factors that influence the process of learning including adherence, empowerment, and motivation.

    Total Semester Credit Hours: 6


    Year One - Fall

    •  DPT 702L Applied Functional Anatomy and Biomechanics I (4 credit hrs)

      This course, the first of two applied functional anatomy and biomechanics courses, will focus on the detailed structure and function of the cervical, temporomandibular, thoracic, and upper extremity joints and their related soft tissues. Students will analyze forces affecting arthrokinematics, osteokinematics, and tissue mechanics of these regions and relate those to overall mobility and stability by way of clinical application. Kinetic and kinematic analysis of movement of these regions will be explored using such tools as EMG, dynamometry and video motion analysis. 

    •  DPT 714L Physiology of Exercise (3 credit hrs)

      This foundational science course introduces and emphasizes the concepts and knowledge of the body's acute physiological response and chronic adaptations to exercise, overuse, and disuse. Topics related to neuromuscular physiology, bioenergetics, cardiopulmonary physiology, circulation, neuroendocrinology, nutrition, and cellular developmental traits will be presented and interrelated. In addition, the physiological effects of factors such as age, gender, body composition, and the environment related to functional activity and human performance will be discussed. 

    •  DPT 720 Experiential Learning and Professionalism I (1 credit hr)

      This seminar format course will prepare the student for full-time clinical internship experiences by highlighting both the professional and practical aspects of the physical therapy profession. Students will develop an increased understanding of professionalism, physical therapy scope of practice and Code of Ethics in the context of contemporary interprofessional healthcare. The course will also explore social issues such as forces that impact health care, the role of legislative and political bodies vis a vis health care, race and class as they impact health care and health seeking behavior, and the role of professional organizations as they impact the health professional. 

    •  DPT 730L Musculoskeletal Examination and Rehabilitation I (5 credit hrs)

      This lecture/laboratory course is the first of two courses that will focus on the foundational elements of examination and assessment that apply to all patients with a potential need for physical therapy services. Students will learn the components of musculoskeletal examination and evaluation of the cervical and thoracic spine and rib cage, temporomandibular joints, upper extremities, and associated structures. Selection of appropriate tests and measures, use of validity, reliability, and best evidence to select tests and measures will also be emphasized. Students will develop and practice using critical thinking and decision-making skills to determine the most appropriate intervention and outcomes for patients. Laboratories will promote development of psychomotor skills in the application of examination and rehabilitation intervention techniques discussed in lecture. Techniques will be discussed and practiced in the context of clinical case problems. 

    •  DPT 740 Clinical Medicine and Pathophysiology I (2 credit hrs)
       This course is designed to challenge the student to evaluate the knowledge of clinical presentations associated with musculoskeletal pathology as a foundation for direct patient care and research. Key topics characteristic of common orthopedic pathologies will be addressed, including etiology; epidemiology; underlying pathophysiology; clinical signs and symptoms related to health conditions; environmental and personal factors related to activity and participation restrictions; prognosis; diagnostic medical procedures; differential diagnosis; medical, pharmacological and surgical management; and expected outcomes. Differential diagnosis related to musculoskeletal pathology of the head, cervical and thoracic spine, and upper extremities will be emphasized. Content presented will encompass pathologies observed across the lifespan.
    •  IPE 750 Interprofessional Seminar in Rehabilitative Medicine I (1 credit hr)

      This course will explore interprofessional collaboration skills within the context of theoretical constructs and underpinnings of IPE. Students will explore the Interprofessional Collaborative Practice Competency Domains of values/ethics, roles/responsibilities, communication, and teams/teamwork as they relate to different healthcare professions, patient populations and practice settings seen in clinical medicine and primary care. Seminar style discussion of patient case study examples will be used to illustrate and reinforce the importance of interprofessional collaborative practice. Knowledge gained in this course will significantly contribute to improved understanding of a team-based approach to patient care seen in contemporary healthcare.

    •  IPE 770L Patient Care Management Skills I (2 credit hrs)
       This course will emphasize the overall assessment, assessment of vital signs and appraisal of lab values, standard precautions and infection control, patient positioning and draping, bed mobility, and will introduce transfers, and body mechanics awareness. Students will also begin to develop problem-solving and critical thinking skills related to patient care within in the context of the interprofessional healthcare team.  Through lecture and lab sessions, students will interact, engage, and collaborate with students from other healthcare disciplines to evaluate simulated patients and interpret findings to design an appropriate patient and family-centered plan of care.

    Total Semester Credit Hours: 18 


    Year One - Spring

    •  DPT 703L Applied Functional Anatomy and Biomechanics II (4 credit hrs)

      This course, the second of two applied functional anatomy and biomechanics courses, will focus on the detailed structure and function of specific anatomical content introduced in DPT 701 to include the lumbar spine and joints of the lower extremity and their related soft tissues. The application of functional anatomy and kinesiology will be reinforced through both static and dynamic analyses of regional human movement and posture. Students will analyze forces affecting arthrokinematics, osteokinematics, and tissue mechanics of these regions and relate those to whole body and regional mobility and stability by way of clinical application. Kinetic and kinematic analysis of movement of these regions will be explored using such tools as EMG, dynamometry and video motion analysis. Students will develop skill in the application of this biomechanical analysis and begin to foster consideration of biomechanical principles in the design of reliable and valid upper quarter examination procedures and efficacious intervention strategies and parameters.

    •  DPT 715L Principles and Application of Therapeutic Modalities (3 credit hrs)

      This lecture/laboratory course will introduce and emphasize the physiologic effects of therapeutic modalities used on human tissue in clinical practice. Lectures will provide an in-depth study of the science of therapeutic modalities. Students will differentiate between the thermal, acoustic, mechanical, and electrical modalities commonly utilized in the clinic. The clinical application of these principles will be reinforced through laboratory practical experiences as well as clinical case studies. Clinical problems are presented in the lecture and laboratory for clinical decision-making on the appropriate, safe, correct, and cost effective application of these devices, skills, or techniques as a component of a comprehensive plan of care to designed to intervene at the level of health conditions, body functions and structures, activities, and participation while recognizing the personal and environmental factors that may impact recovery.

    •  DPT 721 Experiential Learning and Professionalism II (2 credit hrs)

      The student will be introduced to essential information pertaining to clinical performance and will learn how evaluation methods and tools will be implemented during the clinical internships. Students will also learn roles and responsibilities of persons associated with clinical education, policies and procedures for clinical education, delegation and supervision of assistants and aides, aspects of documentation, reporting patient progress, and stress and time management. Students will also develop an understanding of the importance of professional behaviors, self-evaluation and personal reflection and begin to practice these skills prior to applying them on clinical internships. 

    •  DPT 731L Musculoskeletal Examination and Rehabilitation II (5 credit hrs)

      Students will learn the basics of musculoskeletal examination and evaluation of the lumbar spine, lower extremities, and associated structures, selection of appropriate tests and measures, use of validity, reliability, and best evidence to select tests and measures, and the use of critical thinking and decision-making to determine the most appropriate intervention and outcomes for patients. This course will further promote development of knowledge in differentiating musculoskeletal dysfunctions/disorders in the regions noted. Laboratories will promote development of psychomotor skills in the application of examination and rehabilitation intervention techniques discussed in lecture. Techniques will be discussed and practiced in the context of clinical case problems. 

    •  DPT 741 Clinical Medicine and Pathophysiology I (1 credit hr)

      This course is a continuation of the DPT 740 and is designed to continue to challenge the student to evaluate the knowledge of basic clinical presentations associated with musculoskeletal pathology as a foundation for direct patient care and research. Differential diagnosis related to musculoskeletal pathology will be emphasized and will be expended upon to emphasize pathology in the context of the lumbar spine and lower extremities. Content presented will encompass pathologies observed across the lifespan.

    •  DPT 799 Motor Learning and Control I (1 credit hr)
      This course is the first of two courses that explores conceptual and practical issues in motor control and motor learning and helps to form an important theoretical foundation for the practice of evidence-based physical therapy. This course will examine historical and contemporary theories of motor control, postural control, information processing and motor learning, as frameworks for understanding goal-directed, functional movement. It will also explore theories of motor control and postural control as explanatory models for changes in movement capabilities. Environmental task demands will be analyzed from the perspectives of motor control, information processing, and motor learning and potential functional constraints to the motor control and postural control systems will be explored using a systems model within the context of an ICF framework.
    •  IPE 751 Interprofessional Seminar in Rehabilitative Medicine II (1 credit hr)
       This course focuses on the application of interprofessional collaboration skills within the context of theoretical constructs and underpinnings of IPE. Students will apply the Interprofessional Collaborative Practice Competency Domains of values/ethics, roles/responsibilities, communication, and teams/teamwork as they relate to different healthcare professions and patient populations with a focus on musculoskeletal rehabilitation. Simulation and role-playing scenarios will allow for the practice of interprofessional collaborative practice.
    •  IPE 771L Patient Care Management Skills II (1 credit hr)
       This course will emphasize and build upon the skills learned in IPE 770 with regards to assessment, mobility, transfers, gait training with and without an assistive device, wheelchair fitting and mobility, therapeutic exercise and foundational concepts in wound care management. Students will build upon problem-solving and critical thinking skills learned in IPE 770 and apply them to cases related to new content.  Through lecture and lab sessions, students will interact, engage, and collaborate with students from other healthcare disciplines to evaluate simulated patients and interpret findings to design an appropriate patient and family-centered plan of care.

    Total Semester Credit Hours: 18 


    Year Two - Summer

    •  DPT 723 Clinical Internship I - 9 weeks (6 credit hrs)

      This is a nine (9) week full-time clinical internship designed to develop skills deemed appropriate for entry-level physical therapy practice. Those skills include but are not limited to examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, and intervention. To accomplish this, students will participate in direct patient care that may include gait training, transfer training, assessment and measurement, intervention and patient education. Integration of the previous semester's academic curriculum will be the focus of the clinical internship. The facilities utilized for the internship will focus on musculoskeletal or orthopedic patient care.

    Total Semester Credit Hours: 6


    Year Two - Fall 

    •  DPT 800 Motor Learning and Control II (2 credit hrs)

      This course will provide the student with a foundation for examining, evaluating, and providing treatment interventions for individuals with movement dysfunctions, primary and secondary impairments caused by neurological pathology and inclusive of patients with multi-system disorders. Emphasis is placed on understanding normal and impaired movement through discussion, hands on skill development and experiential learning opportunities focusing on motor control, motor learning, and neuroplasticity. The ICF model of enablement and the task oriented conceptual framework for intervention will be used as frameworks for evaluating movement dysfunction and for developing intervention plans.

    •  DPT 802 Neurobiology I (3 credit hrs)

      This course will explore the structure and function of the human nervous system by examining the molecules, cells, and circuits that are involved in directing our behavior. Topics will emphasize how the nervous system is built during development, how it changes with experience throughout life, how it functions in normal behavior, and how it is disrupted by injury and disease.  Students will acquire the foundational neurologic concepts providing a basis for future neuroscience courses as well as enhancing their understanding of neurologic diagnoses frequently observed in the clinical practice. The concepts addressed in this course will include gross structures of the central nervous system, blood supply, and the sensory and motor systems.

    •  DPT 806 Clinical Problem Solving in Musculoskeletal Rehab (1 credit hr)
       This course will provide students an opportunity to further explore topics in musculoskeletal rehabilitation through a problem-based learning format and review/remediate skills from the first year. This course will have distinct but related units to promote and enhance further proficiency in musculoskeletal rehabilitation patient/client management. Paper cases will be analyzed to further enhance differential diagnosis skills. Examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, and intervention strategies will be explored using current best evidence. Students will present a patient case from their summer clinical internship (DPT 723) to allow the student learner further opportunity to critically think and problem solve as it relates to a patient with musculoskeletal pathology. ​
    •  DPT 810 Intro to Clinical Research and Applied Biostatistics (2 credit hrs)

      This course introduces students to the continuum of research methodologies and designs commonly used in clinical research. They will evaluate the merit and relevance of published research to the practice of physical therapy. Ethical issues in clinical research will be considered including the role of institutional review boards and the requirements of informed consent. Students will lead discussions of research papers, considering key concepts such as sampling, experimental controls, levels of measurement, sensitivity, specificity, reliability and validity. Students will use both calculators and computer software (i.e., SPSS, Excel, R) to analyze data and develop graphic representations. Students will write a research question (or questions) that may form the basis of their research project. They will search the published literature and write a preliminary literature review relative to their research question. Groups of students will be linked with a faculty research advisor who will guide them through the process of clinical research in DPT 811 and DPT 912.The culmination of the student's research will be a poster presentation at the Research Symposium in the Fall Semester of year three.

    •  DPT 814 Psychosocial Aspects of Health and Disability (2 credit hrs)

      This course applies biopsychosocial models of health, illness, and disability, including psychosocial aspects of disability; social attitudes and perceptions; adjustment to and secondary effects of disability. This course will develop student competence in responding to individuals who are experiencing physical and psychiatric problems. Through readings, guest speakers, video, community experiences, and in class discussions, this course is intended to challenge the perception of both physical and psychiatric disability.

    •  DPT 830L Neuromuscular Examination and Rehabilitation I (5 credit hrs)
      This course is the first of two courses which will apply the conceptual framework of physical therapy management to patients/clients with neuromuscular rehabilitative needs. Students will apply fundamentals of neuroscience, anatomy, patient evaluation, motor learning/control, and therapeutic exercise as a foundation to evaluate and treat patients with movement disorders resulting from neurologic disease or injury. Enablement/Disablement models, the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice, Guidelines for Content in Physical Therapy Education, and other conceptual frameworks that aid the physical therapist in evidence-based clinical decision making and reasoning will be explored. Specific standardized assessments, evaluation and treatment strategies, and rehabilitation practices will be addresses related to movement disorders associated with neurologic injury/disease, specifically spinal cord injury and stroke. 
    •  DPT 840 Clinical Medicine and Pathophysiology II (2 credit hrs)
      This course is designed to challenge the student to evaluate the knowledge of clinical presentations associated with the neuromuscular system as a foundation for direct patient/client care and research. Key topics characteristic of common neuromuscular pathologies will be addressed, including etiology; epidemiology; underlying pathophysiology and histology; clinical signs and symptoms related impairments, activity and participation limitations; natural history and prognosis; diagnostic medical procedures; differential diagnosis; medical, pharmacological and surgical management; and expected outcomes. Differential diagnosis related to neuromuscular pathology will be emphasized and applied to determine appropriateness of physical therapy intervention.
    •  IPE 850 Interprofessional Seminar in Rehabilitative Medicine III (1 credit hr)

      This course immerses students in interprofessional collaboration and teamwork through the application and integration of skills introduced in previous courses, but with emphasis placed on the care of patients with neurological disorders/diseases/injuries. These sessions will act as forums within which the student learner will have the opportunity to conceptualize each aspect of rehabilitation and build them into an overall framework of patient/client care. Each session will generally have a theme of interest such that students can build upon their level of understanding of that material as well as experience, appreciate and value the complexity of the entire process. These forums are designed to act as interprofessional learning communities to promote independent as well as collaborative critical thinking and thought. Various learning methods will be used including case study discussion and interprofessional high fidelity simulation experiences.

    Total Semester Credit Hours: 18


    Year Two - Spring

    •  DPT 803 Neurobiology II (3 credit hrs)

      In this course, students will build on their knowledge of the structure and function of the central and peripheral nervous systems gained in DPT 802 and apply it with respect to neuropathology. Students will be encouraged to develop and apply critical thinking skills related and use evidence related to altered neurological structures and function of the nervous system in various neuropathologies common to physical therapy practice.

    •  DPT 805 Integumentary Dysfunction and Tissue Repair (3 credit hrs)

      The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the skin and its appendages as they relate to wound etiology, evaluation, treatment, and prevention. It will address the diversified issues of clinical management of the individual with a primary and/or secondary integumentary disorder as they relate to the practice of physical therapy. Topics will include practice setting specific management principles and techniques as they relate to individuals across their life span, with disorders of the integumentary system including, but not limited to burns, pressure ulcers, arterial and venous stasis disorders, neuropathic lesions, dermatitis, and cellulitis. The student will acquire skills within a theoretical and practical spectrum as it relates to clinical management, environmental constraints, and critical pathways.

    •  DPT 811 Clinical Research I (1 credit hr)

      While continuing to work in small groups, students in this course will continue to build on the area of inquiry established in DPT 811 which included articulation of a research question and a preliminary evidence-based literature review. Groups will meet regularly throughout the semester with the faculty mentor for discussion of key issues related to the research process including analysis and synthesis of the research literature, experimental design, methodology, data analysis, etc.  A written comprehensive evidence-based literature review will be submitted by each group reflecting the semester's work. Students are also expected to participate collaboratively in data collection and analysis.

    •  DPT 815L Rehabilitation Throughout the Lifespan (3 credit hrs)
      This course provides an overview of normal and abnormal human development across the lifespan in the pediatric, adolescent, adult, and geriatric populations. The course will include the following: typical development, reflexes and the role of reflexes in movement development, atypical development and its clinical outcomes, and review of motor control/motor learning theories and their application to each population. Assessment and therapeutic intervention strategies for each population will also be addressed. The course will cover selected medical conditions specific to each population. Students will learn to identify underlying impairments in multiple physiological systems that lead to functional, activity, and participation limitations in these populations. 
    •  DPT 831L Neuromuscular Examination and Rehabilitation II (5 credit hrs)
       

      Students will apply fundamentals of neuroscience, anatomy, patient evaluation, motor learning/control, and therapeutic exercise as a foundation to evaluate and treat patients with movement disorders resulting from neurologic disease or injury. Enablement/Disablement models, the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice, Guidelines for Content in Physical Therapy Education, and other conceptual frameworks that aid the physical therapist in evidence-based clinical decision making and reasoning will be explored. Specific standardized assessments, evaluation and treatment strategies, and rehabilitation practices will be addresses related to movement disorders associated with neurologic injury/disease, specifically traumatic brain injury and other neurologic disorders. Course content will reinforce the development of professional and ethical behaviors, the scope of physical therapy practice, collaborative practice models, therapeutic communication skills, and documentation. Laboratory sessions will promote the development of skill in the application of examination and intervention techniques discussed in lecture.

    •  DPT 841 Clinical Medicine and Pathophysiology II (1 credit hr)

      This course is designed to continue to challenge the student to evaluate the knowledge of basic clinical presentations associated with neuromuscular pathology as a foundation for direct patient care and research. Key topics characteristic of common neurologic pathologies will be addressed, including etiology; epidemiology; underlying pathophysiology; clinical signs and symptoms related to impairments, functional limitations, and disabilities; natural history and prognosis; diagnostic medical procedures; differential diagnosis; medical, pharmacological and surgical management; and expected outcomes. Differential diagnosis related to neurological pathologies will be emphasized and will be expanded upon to emphasize pathology in the context of the stroke, spinal cord injuries/disorders, traumatic brain injuries, and other neurological pathologies observed across the lifespan.

    •  IPE 851 Interprofessional Seminar in Rehabilitative Medicine IV (1 credit hr)
      This course focuses on the application of interprofessional collaboration skills within the context of theoretical constructs and underpinnings of IPE. Students will apply the Interprofessional Collaborative Practice Competency Domains of values/ethics, roles/responsibilities, communication, and teams/teamwork as they relate to different healthcare professions and patient populations with a focus on neurological rehabilitation. Simulation and role-playing scenarios will allow for the practice of interprofessional collaborative practice. 

    Total Semester Credit Hours: 17 


    Year Three - Summer

    •  DPT 823 Clinical Internship II - 9 weeks (6 credit hrs)

      The focus of this internship will be the management of patients/clients with neuromuscular disorders, incorporating information and skills acquired in the previous academic semesters. The facilities utilized for the internship will focus on neurorehabilitation of any age group.

    Total Semester Credit Hours: 17


    Year Three - Fall

    •  DPT 906 Clinical Problem Solving in Neuromuscular Rehab (1 credit hr)

      This course will explore special topics in neuromuscular rehabilitation through a tutorial problem-based learning format and review/remediate skills from the second year to promote the development of clinical reasoning, clinical problem solving, collaborative skills, skills in self-assessment and independent learning. Students will present a patient case from their summer clinical internship (DPT 823) to allow the student learner further opportunity to critically think and problem solve as it relates to a patient with neurological pathology. Students will be required to apply knowledge from didactic and clinical courses in the first and second years to differentially diagnose patients presented in case studies. These cases will also highlight social/cultural/psychosocial issues, legal and ethical aspects of professional behavior, and integration of published literature into clinical practice.  

    •  DPT 912 Clinical Research II (1 credit hour)

      During this semester the student will continue to execute the research investigation designed in DPT 810 and 811. It is expected that the student in conjunction with the research mentor and peers will have completed a research proposal and will have submitted that proposal to the LMU Institutional Review Board. Following approval by the IRB and working closely with the research mentor, the students will collect and analyze data. The culmination of the course will be platform and/or poster presentation at the annual Research Symposium open to the LMU community, as well as interested individuals from the broader professional community.

    •  DPT 930L Cardiopulmonary Examination and Rehabilitation (4 credit hrs)

      This lecture and laboratory course will address the diversified issues of clinical management of patient/client with primary and/or secondary cardiovascular and pulmonary dysfunction within the context of physical therapy. Best practices to integrate and apply existing evidence into comprehensive patient-client management programs will be discussed, as well as prevention of dysfunction in individuals across their lifespan. This course is designed to challenge students to differentiate and prioritize clinical findings based upon level of acuity, patient preference, and knowledge of anatomy, pathophysiology, pharmacology, and diagnostic imaging.  Case scenarios will integrate principles of differential diagnosis and establishment of long-term management of cardiovascular and pulmonary conditions.

    •  DPT 940 Clinical Medicine and Pathophysiology III (3 credit hrs)

      This course is designed to challenge the student to evaluate the knowledge of clinical presentations associated with cardiovascular, pulmonary, and integumentary systems, as well as general medicine topics including gastrointestinal, urogenital, metabolic, and oncologic pathologies, as a foundation for direct patient care and research. 

    •  DPT 970 Management and Administration in Physical Therapy (2 credit hrs)
       A broad survey of topics essential to the administration and management of physical therapy services. Topics covered will include: strategic planning, organizational structure, reimbursement and income management, budgeting, marketing, personnel management, quality assurance, ethical dilemmas and problem solving, professional regulation and the legislative process, various forms of liability and risk management, health care policy and systems of health care service delivery, contract issues and the negotiation process, documentation issues, and appropriate delegation, supervision and collaboration in the provision of physical therapy services.
    •  DPT 980 Community Health and Wellness (2 credit hrs)
       This course will provide the student with the conceptual framework for individual and community health promotion, as well as injury/disease prevention across the life span and in various populations. Course content includes examination of concepts of health, health promotion, wellness and prevention, and health-related quality of life. Current theories of health behavior change will be discussed, as well as issues of adherence and compliance, locus of control, motivation, and the influence of culture and context on health promotion. To demonstrate understanding and application of the key concepts of health behavior change, students will assess their own level of wellness, implement a personal plan to address a particular health behavior, and analyze the outcome of the intervention. Community-based health promotion will also be addressed including needs assessment, planning, resources, and process and outcome assessment. Students will apply their knowledge by creating a community-based health promotion or disease/injury prevention program and present their project to their peers. 
    •  DPT 99X Elective courses* (1 credit hr each - students will take 2)

      Potential Elective courses offered include: Advanced Wound Care, Pain Science and Management, Advanced Imaging, Dry Needling, McKenzie Manual Therapy Parts A and B, Maitland Manual Therapy.

      *Elective offerings are subject to change depending on availability.

    •  IPE 950 Interprofessional Seminar in Rehabilitative Medicine V (1 credit hr)
       This course focuses on the application of interprofessional collaboration skills within the context of theoretical constructs and underpinnings of IPE. Students will apply the Interprofessional Collaborative Practice Competency Domains of values/ethics, roles/responsibilities, communication, and teams/teamwork as they relate to different healthcare professions and patient populations with a focus on neurological rehabilitation. Simulation and role-playing scenarios will allow for the practice of interprofessional collaborative practice. 

    Total Semester Credit Hours: 16


    Year Three - Spring

    •  DPT 923 Clinical Internship III - 8 weeks (5 credit hrs)

      This is a nine (9) week full-time clinical internship designed to integrate all the academic knowledge gained as well as incorporate the previous clinical experiences to attain skills and behaviors of an entry-level physical therapist. The facilities utilized for the internship will focus on in-patient care of any age group and any setting.

    •  DPT 925 Clinical Internship IV - 8 weeks (5 credit hrs)

      This is the final nine (9) week full-time clinical internship designed to enhance the student's entry- level skills in a special interest area of physical therapy. The facilities utilized for this internship will incorporate any setting appropriate for the delivery of physical therapy patient/client care.

    •  DPT 999 Independent Study - Board Examination Prep (1 credit hr)

      Students will use the board exam study plan created during the on-campus board exam review course at the end of the Fall semester of Year Three. In this independent study course, students will follow their personalized study plan for the National Physical Therapy Exam (NPTE) which will consist of the completion of online review modules, video assessments, and practice multiple-choice questions as well as full-length examinations to allow for meaningful self-assessment related to essential academic content seen on the NPTE.

    Total Semester Credit Hours: 11


      

    Curriculum Total: 116 Credit Hours