Lincoln Memorial University

Scholarly Activity

Faculty

Dr. Chessica Cave

Cave

Personal Bio

Dr. Chessica Cave is an Associate Professor and works primarily with LMU’s Teacher Education Program.  Dr. Cave excels in the areas of teaching, program administration, and curriculum development.  Dr. Cave’s research and publishing interests include, but are not limited to, teaching strategies in higher education and the effects of positive teacher-student relationships. 


Wagner, S. R., & Cave, C. (2019, October). Together in the flow: Introducing teacher candidates to reading strategies through face-to-face and online literature circle discussion groups. Lecture presented at the International Literacy Association annual conference, New Orleans, LA.


Wagner Co-Presenters - Dr. Susan Wagner

 

Abstract

As professors of undergraduate and graduate students, we have witnessed students who are disconnected from reading. The Literature Circle model (Daniels, 1994, 2002) follows the parameters of formal cooperative learning models defined by Johnson and Johnson (1989, 2009) where students meet in small groups in order to reach specific learning goals. In our literacy courses, students' groups are formed around selected texts, and discussions are framed through different reading roles. This hands-on workshop demonstrated two methods of incorporating the Literature Circle cooperative learning model into an educator preparation course through face-to-face class meetings or in online learning environments.


Cave, C. (2019, January). Benefits of online literature circles in the college arena. Paper presented at the Global Business & International Management Conference. San Antonio, TX.


Abstract

Due to the tremendous focus on technology inclusion in today’s society, it is common for faculty to discover new ways to implement technology within class activities. One big challenge education professors face in the collegiate classroom is the reduction of face-to-face time. So, the question becomes how to provide content coverage all the while ensuring candidates are receiving quality instruction methodology. This paper describes how online literature circles have empowered students to become effective future teachers.


Cave. C. (2018). Benefits of online literature circles in the college arena. Journal of Global Business Management, 14(2), 47-56.


Abstract

Due to the tremendous focus on technology inclusion in today’s society, it is common for faculty to discover new ways to implement technology within class activities. One big challenge education professors face in the collegiate classroom is the reduction of face-to-face time. So, the question becomes how to provide content coverage all the while ensuring candidates are receiving quality instruction methodology. This paper describes how online literature circles have empowered students to become effective future teachers.


Cave, C. (2018, October). Small steps lead to big success: Embedding edTPA throughout your program. Lecture presented at the Teacher Performance Assessment (TPA) National Conference, San Jose, CA.


Abstract

How do teacher education programs effectively help prepare candidates to pass edTPA? When making instructional decisions, teacher educators must ask: “Are we modeling and incorporating good instructional practices to help our candidates prepare for edTPA?” This presentation focused on how to embed edTPA throughout teacher education programs by incorporating units of studies, literature circles, and centers. 


"Creating a Mutlimodal Lecture" 

Paper presented to the 22nd World Multi-Conference on Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics, Orlando, FL

 

July 10, 2018

 

Abstract
Many teachers agree that there is no simple “recipe” to teaching. One of the challenges of being a teacher is designing lectures that keep students engaged, interested, curious, and willingly attentive. The paper presented discussed how to turn a traditional lecture into a multimodal lecture in order maximally involve, enthuse, and motivate students toward deeper learning.  


Teaching Techniques: Beyond Lecturing

Conference on Teaching Large Classes, 4th Annual, Blacksburg, VA


February 17, 2018


Conference on Higher Education Pedagogy, 10th Annual, Blacksburg, VA


February 15, 2018


International Conference on Teaching and Leadership Excellence, 39th Annual, Austin, TX


May 28, 2017


Abstract

As the dynamics of education change, so does the way our students learn and respond to classroom strategies.  The traditional way of teaching through lecture is no longer sufficient nor effective. This presentation examines how to revitalize instruction through the integration of active learning strategies that facilitate interaction with students.


"Teaching Strategies: Beyond Lecturing" 

9th Annual Conference on Higher Education Pedagogy

The Inn at Virginia Tech and the Skelton Conference Center


Abstract

Dr. Cave's presentation examined how to revitalize instruction through the integration of active learning strategies that facilitate interaction with students. A hands-on approach will demonstrate teaching techniques that have multiple benefits and are more efficient than a typical lecture for elevating student’s attention and engagement.

 

Dr. Shannon Collins

Collins

Personal Bio

Since receiving his PhD in Literacy Studies from the University of Tennessee, Dr. Collins’s primary research interests are how people experience writing as well as the teaching of writing. As a full professor in LMU’s EdD Program, Collins teaches, directs dissertation research, and serves on the editorial review board of the English Journal. In 2018, LMU recognized Dr. Collins by presenting to him the Houston Award, the University’s award for exemplary professional teaching achievement.


Gaines, C. B., Courtner, A. S., & Collins, S. D.  (2019, September). Dissertation Homeroom in a doctoral program. Lecture presented at the meeting of the Appalachian College Association Summit, Pigeon Forge, TN.


Gaines-Courtner-Collins Co-Presenters - Dr. Andrew Courtner & Dr. Cherie Gaines

 

Abstract

At the 2018 ACA Summit, LMU EdD faculty discussed a new sequential core curriculum, offered across concentrations (Instructional Leadership, Curriculum and Instruction, and Higher Education) to better prepare students for completion of dissertation work. In this presentation, the EdD faculty discussed an innovative Dissertation Homeroom, where students across curricula concentrations are provided collaborative instruction from all faculty, which is then supported in core research courses and individual concentration courses by faculty. This collaboration effort has supported faculty cohesiveness in teaching writing for the dissertation, provided students the opportunity to learn about research and assignments in a large group with other faculty, and supported in-class assignments and the sequential core for individual concentration work.


Collins, S. D. (2019, July). Writing the wrongs of developing K-12 writers. Lecture presented at the 2nd annual meeting of the Smoky Mountain Literacy Council Summer Conference, Knoxville, TN.


Abstract

Traditional writing instruction is rooted in a paradigm that began in the late 1800s that emphasized (to the extreme) mechanical/grammatical correctness. With writing being a linguistic phenomenon, and, thus, a developmental process, traditional approaches to teaching writing have not only stymied student development but have caused many teachers to foster negative attitudes toward teaching writing. Dr. Collins charted this nefarious history of teaching writing as well offered strategies to shift the paradigm of corrective instruction to one that effectively develops competent, healthy writers.


Collins, S. D. (2019, June). “Try for something happier”: Gracefully freeing writing voices of highly intelligent, but (as yet) voiceless students. Workshop presented at the 25th annual conference of the Assembly for Expanded Perspectives on Learning of the National Council of Teachers of English, Estes Park, CO.


Abstract

For this interactive workshop, Dr. Collins presented original research on how the traditional deficit-based, corrective approach to “teaching writing” stymies the growth of writers. He also shared specific andragogical methods of coaching and responding to more powerfully and effectively develop graduate writers while honoring what William Stafford aspired to do as a writing teacher, which was to “Try for something happier.”


Collins, S. D. & Silberman, S. W. (2018, October). Transformational writing development: Research-to-practice innovations in adult graduate education. A concurrent session presented at the 67th annual conference of the American Association for Adult and Continuing Education: Myrtle Beach, SC..


Collins and Silberman Co-Presenter - Dr. Peter Silberman

 

Abstract

Drs. Collins and Silberman shared transformational research-to-practice innovations that they and their EdD colleagues implemented in the form of a sequential writing curriculum to develop doctoral students as writers. Collins and Silberman discussed original research underpinning the EdD program’s writing paradigm shift, shared successful principles through which to develop writers, and engaged attendees in a discussion of individual writing experiences.


Collins, S. D. & Silberman, S. W. (2017, November). For once I felt normal: Interrupting the isolated, deficit-based development of graduate writers. A concurrent session presented at the 66th conference of the American Association for Adult and Continuing Education: Memphis, TN.


Collins and Silberman Co-Presenter - Dr. Peter Silberman

 

Abstract

Based on their original research on the writing experiences and dispositions of graduate students, Collins and Silberman shared how university faculty should be intentional and positive in their approach to developing graduate students’ writing abilities. Critical to the developmental process is a focus on the writers’ strengths and potential as well as ample modeling and response from professors.

 

Dr. Andrew Courtner

Courtner

Personal Bio

Dr. Andrew Courtner currently serves as EdD Program Director and Assistant Professor of Education at Lincoln Memorial University. Prior to his current role, Dr. Courtner served in various administrative roles in higher education focused on student success, retention, and academic advising.


Courtner, A. S., & Kirk, J. M. (2019, September). Examining self-directed learning readiness growth among doctoral candidates through a sequential core curriculum. Lecture presented at the meeting of the Appalachian College Association Summit, Pigeon Forge, TN.


Kirk Co-Presenters - Dr. Julia Kirk

 

Abstract

To help students gain skills to be ready for the dissertation phase, the faculty of the LMU EdD program developed a sequential core curriculum. The EdD faculty measured students’ self-directed learning readiness three times throughout the first year of the program to determine if their readiness changed throughout the first year in the sequential core curriculum to better prepare them for the dissertation phase. Attendees will gain knowledge on the purpose of the sequential core and how doctoral candidates' self-directed learning readiness changed through the curriculum. This session is beneficial for graduate program directors and faculty.


Gaines, C. B., Courtner, A. S., & Collins, S. D.  (2019, September). Dissertation Homeroom in a doctoral program. Lecture presented at the meeting of the Appalachian College Association Summit, Pigeon Forge, TN.


Gaines-Courtner-Collins Co-Presenters - Dr. Shannon Collins & Dr. Cherie Gaines

 

Abstract

At the 2018 ACA Summit, LMU EdD faculty discussed a new sequential core curriculum, offered across concentrations (Instructional Leadership, Curriculum and Instruction, and Higher Education) to better prepare students for completion of dissertation work. In this presentation, the EdD faculty discussed an innovative Dissertation Homeroom, where students across curricula concentrations are provided collaborative instruction from all faculty, which is then supported in core research courses and individual concentration courses by faculty. This collaboration effort has supported faculty cohesiveness in teaching writing for the dissertation, provided students the opportunity to learn about research and assignments in a large group with other faculty, and supported in-class assignments and the sequential core for individual concentration work.


Gaines, C. B., & Courtner, A. S. (2019, September). Trends of college admission from one Tennessee rural school district after Tennessee Promise. Lecture presented at the meeting of the Appalachian College Association Summit, Pigeon Forge, TN.


Gaines Co-Presenter - Dr. Cherie Gaines

 

Abstract

As educators, it is imperative that we understand the change in the trends of college enrollment prior to and subsequent to the Tennessee Promise scholarship program. Understanding these trends will help public school educators focus their attention on the students' needs and will help re-focus based on academic match rather than solely program suggestions. Identifying these trends will benefit higher education staff as they consider new applicants; higher education professors as we guide public school educators; and public school administrators, counselors, and teachers as they provide guidance to their own students.


Courtner, A., & Gaines, C. B. (2019, March). Sequential core curriculum to improve dissertation skills in a doctoral program. Presented at the Critical Questions in Education Conference, Savannah, GA.

 

Theriot Co-Presenter - Dr. Cherie Gaines

   

Abstract

Completing a dissertation is an intellectual challenge and often a problem for doctoral students. The LMU doctoral faculty developed a sequential core curriculum to increase doctoral candidates’ readiness for the dissertation phase.


Investigation of Self-Directed Learning Readiness Among Doctoral Candidates

 

American Association for Adult and Continuing Education, 67th Annual, Myrtle Beach, SC. 

 

October 4, 2018

 

Courtner and Kirk Co-Presenter - Dr. Julia Kirk

   

Abstract

Adults often prefer to learn in a self-directed manner; therefore, one could assume that doctoral candidates might exhibit some level of self-directed learning readiness. The dissertation phase of a doctoral program hinges on the candidate’s ability to be self-directed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the self-directed learning readiness of doctoral candidates.


Sequential Core Curriculum to Improve Dissertation Skills in a Doctoral Program

 

Appalachian College Association, 2018 Summit Meeting, Kingsport, TN.

 

September 28, 2018

 

Courtner and Gaines Co-Presenter - Dr. Cherie Gaines

   

Abstract

The presentation discussed the sequential core, the purpose, assignments, rubrics, and benefits the program faculty have experienced already in the EdD program.

Dr. Barbara Flanagan

Flanagan

Personal Bio

Dr. Barbara Flanagan, an Assistant Professor in Graduate Education, received her doctorate from Virginia Tech. Barbara has 36 years of experience in K-12 teaching, special education supervision, state department of education technical assistance provision, national educational consulting, and higher education teaching. Barbara has conducted numerous workshops on Universal Design Learning (UDL) and has co-authored a white paper on the topic.


Flanagan, B. (2019, March). Creating community, enhancing engagement, and fostering verbal expression through a video discussion platform. Paper presented at the UDL-IRN (Universal Design for Learning—Implementation and Research Network) 6th International Summit, Orlando, FL

   

Abstract

UDL principles and related guidelines (CAST, 2011) support curriculum, instruction and assessment that are flexible and embed options for multiple means of representation, action and expression, and engagement. This session detailed how Dr. Flanagan piloted Flipgrid, a video discussion platform, and provided participants recommendations for its use in higher education courses.


Dr. Karen Foster

Foster

Personal Bio

Dr. Karen Foster, LMU’s edTPA Coordinator, is a life-long educator with classroom and higher-education teaching experiences in 7 different states. Dr. Foster is a “qualified” National Higher Education Scorer for edTPA. She is a founding member of the National Professional Development School Organization (NAPDS): she serves as section editor for the PDS Partners Magazine, and as a reviewer for the School-University Partnership research journal. She is a CAEP accreditation site visitor.


Foster, K., Tiller, D., & Stewart, T. (2019, March). Candidate support and success: Alleviating stress and building a strong sense of self-efficacy.  Information presented at the Educative Teacher Performance Assessment (edTPA) Southeast Regional Conference, Franklin, TN.    

 

Abstract

The session focused on candidate support through an examination and engagement of  EPP-based  and  candidate-intrinsic supports. Both types of supports can be utilized to ensure that candidates are successful in submitting passing edTPA portfolios and that the anxiety often associated with testing is reduced and replaced with determination and confidence. 


Foster, K., Jones, S., Lynch, S., & Bicknell, T. (2019, February). Building mutually beneficial partnerships in rural communities. Information presented at the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE) 71st annual meeting, Louisville, KY.

 

Abstract

The  session described the steps involved in developing  mutually beneficial partnerships.  The  session looked at the various aspects of partnership development,  tools, and strategies available to support the development of the partnerships (e.g., conducting needs assessments, developing recruitment strategies, reviewing data , braining-storming, creative problem solving, and utilizing templates).


Foster, K. (2019, February).  Clinical Practice Fellow Recognition, Association of Teacher Educators (ATE), Atlanta, GA.

 

Abstract

The Clinical Practice Fellows are a group of educators who have a strong research interest in clinical practice. Selected through a competitive process, the Clinical Practice Fellows  network with one another, share research interests, and engage in a national dialogue about  putting clinical practice at the center of teacher education. 


Foster, K. & McCook, J. (2018, October). Building mutually beneficial partnerships in rural  communities: Supporting the implementation of edTPA. Invited presentation at the TPA National   Conference, San Jose, CA.

 

McCook Co-Presenter - Dr. John E. McCook

   

Abstract

This presentation focused on establishing mutually beneficial partnerships that could be adapted to meet the specific needs of the various EPPs and P-12 partners (e.g., those supporting the implementation of edTPA or those serving rural communities). Drs. Foster and McCook shared the steps, mechanisms, and tools involved in establishing the mutually beneficial partnerships.


Support for Candidates who Student Teach in Rural Settings

Southeastern Regional Conference edTPA Conference, April 5-7, 2018, Birmingham, Alabama

 

April 7, 2018

 

McCook Co-Presenter - Dr. John E. McCook

   

Abstract

The Educative Assessment and Meaningful Support, 2016 edTPA Administrative Report, released November, 2017, denoted small differences in performance of candidates by demographic subgroups. Candidates who completed student teaching in rural locales had the lowest average scores. The interactive session elicited audience participation in examining factors that might contribute to the lower scores received by candidates who taught in rural settings and identified effective candidate supports.


How Does the Implementation of edTPA Impact Collaborative Partnerships?

2018 National Association of Professional Development Schools National Conference, Jacksonville, Florida

 

March 17, 2018

 

McCook Co-Presenter - Dr. John E. McCook

   

Abstract

This presentation encouraged participants to think critically and collaboratively identify structural supports and collaborative changes that impact collaborative school partnerships. Foster and McCook presented what strong EPP/P-12 partnerships look like in states where the successful completion of an edTPA portfolio is required before teachers can become licensed. They also explained the various structural supports necessary to sustain all the participants in the partnerships.

 

 

Dr. Cherie Gaines

 
Gaines

Personal Bio

Cherie Barnett Gaines began her career in 2001 as a middle school teacher of science, reading, and English. Cherie earned her PhD from The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, with a concentration in Educational Administration and Supervision, and she currently works as an Assistant Professor of Education in the doctoral program at Lincoln Memorial University. Dr. Gaines’s research includes rural schools, teacher leadership, school climate, social justice, middle school education, and leadership preparation.


Gaines, C. B., Courtner, A. S., & Collins, S. D.  (2019, September). Dissertation Homeroom in a doctoral program. Lecture presented at the meeting of the Appalachian College Association Summit, Pigeon Forge, TN.


Gaines-Courtner-Collins Co-Presenters - Dr. Shannon Collins & Dr. Andrew Courtner

 

Abstract

At the 2018 ACA Summit, LMU EdD faculty discussed a new sequential core curriculum, offered across concentrations (Instructional Leadership, Curriculum and Instruction, and Higher Education) to better prepare students for completion of dissertation work. In this presentation, the EdD faculty discussed an innovative Dissertation Homeroom, where students across curricula concentrations are provided collaborative instruction from all faculty, which is then supported in core research courses and individual concentration courses by faculty. This collaboration effort has supported faculty cohesiveness in teaching writing for the dissertation, provided students the opportunity to learn about research and assignments in a large group with other faculty, and supported in-class assignments and the sequential core for individual concentration work.


Gaines, C. B., & Courtner, A. S. (2019, September). Trends of college admission from one Tennessee rural school district after Tennessee Promise. Lecture presented at the meeting of the Appalachian College Association Summit, Pigeon Forge, TN.


Murphree Co-Presenter - Dr. Andrew Courtner

 

Abstract

As educators, it is imperative that we understand the change in the trends of college enrollment prior to and subsequent to the Tennessee Promise scholarship program. Understanding these trends will help public school educators focus their attention on the students' needs and will help re-focus based on academic match rather than solely program suggestions. Identifying these trends will benefit higher education staff as they consider new applicants; higher education professors as we guide public school educators; and public school administrators, counselors, and teachers as they provide guidance to their own students.


Murphree, P. G., & Gaines, C. B. (2019, September). Metamorphosis from traditional pedagogy to synchronous and asynchronous learning. Lecture presented at the meeting of the Appalachian College Association Summit, Pigeon Forge, TN.


Murphree Co-Presenter - Dr. Patricia Murphree

 

Abstract

This presentation explored the roles of new technology and how it is impacting the traditional classroom by advancing a system called “e-learning”. E-learning can be divided into two categories. Synchronous includes incorporating online learning though video conferencing, webcasts, interactive learning models and chat rooms by supporting learning and teaching through multiple ways of interacting, sharing, collaborating and asking questions in “real-time”. Asynchronous can be offline because it involves coursework delivered through web activities, email, on-line forums, electronic portfolios, and message boards. How may e-learning be incorporated into effective pedagogy? Can e-learning be designed to share pedagogical and/or co-curricular innovations without compromising content rigor? The presentation benefited anyone teaching Generation “Z” students.


Gaines, C. B. (Ed.). (2019). Leadership for school improvement: Reflection and renewal. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishers.


Gaines, C. B. (2019). An historical evolution of school improvement. In C. B. Gaines (Ed.), Leadership for school improvement: Reflection and renewal (pp. 1-18). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishers.


Gaines, C. B. (2019). Introduction: Evolution of school improvement: Reflection and renewal. In C. B. Gaines (Ed.), Leadership for school improvement: Reflection and renewal (pp. ix-xiii). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishers.


Gaines, C. B. (2019). School leadership renewal. In C. B. Gaines (Ed.), Leadership for school improvement: Reflection and renewal (pp. 117-126). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishers.


Abstract

As the inaugural entry in the Leadership for School Improvement (LSI) Special Interest Group (SIG) Book Series, this volume serves as a reflection on the foundations of the field of school improvement. Contents include connections between school improvement and the agency of principals, districts, universities, and policy. This volume will be placed in the school improvement literature with examinations of evolution, trends, policies, and future foci in the field of school improvement. This book is rich in research and literature about school improvement, school effectiveness, and school reform policy and implementation and thus holds significance for educational practitioners, scholars, and policy makers at all levels.


Gaines, C. B. (2019, April). Teacher leadership in rural middle schools. Lecture presented at the Lincoln Memorial University Third Annual Research Day, Harrogate, TN.


Abstract

Due to unique characteristics and specialized needs, rural schools served as sites for investigation of the four factor model of teacher leadership: sharing leadership, principal selection, sharing experiences, and supra-practitioner. Teachers in rural schools wear many hats, specifically identifying with the supra-practitioner.


Gaines, C. B. & Courtner, A. (2019, April). Sequential core curriculum to improve dissertation skills in a doctoral program. Lecture presented at the Lincoln Memorial University Third Annual Research Day, Harrogate, TN.

 

Courtner Co-Presenter - Dr. Andrew Courtner

   

Abstract

Completing a dissertation is an intellectual challenge and often a problem for doctoral students. The LMU doctoral faculty developed a sequential core curriculum to increase doctoral candidates’ readiness for the dissertation phase.


Gaines, C. B. (2019, March). Teacher leadership in rural middle schools. Presented at the Critical Questions in Education Conference, Savannah, GA.


Abstract

Due to unique characteristics and specialized needs, rural schools served as sites for investigation of the four factor model of teacher leadership: sharing leadership, principal selection, sharing experiences, and supra-practitioner. Teachers in rural schools wear many hats, specifically identifying with the supra-practitioner.


Courtner, A., & Gaines, C. B. (2019, March). Sequential core curriculum to improve dissertation skills in a doctoral program. Presented at the Critical Questions in Education Conference, Savannah, GA.

 

Courtner Co-Presenter - Dr. Andrew Courtner

   

Abstract

Completing a dissertation is an intellectual challenge and often a problem for doctoral students. The LMU doctoral faculty developed a sequential core curriculum to increase doctoral candidates’ readiness for the dissertation phase.


Models of Teacher Leadership: Perspectives from Four Countries

British Educational Leadership, Management & Administration Society, Windsor, UK

 

July 8, 2018

 

Abstract

This study examined teachers’ perceptions of teacher leadership in US rural school districts. Teachers filled multiple roles within the school, including both formal and informal leadership roles, as a result of the unique needs of this demographic. Findings indicated teachers identified characteristics of being a supra-practitioner (Angelle & Dehart, 2016) as being integral to the success of their schools.

Sequential Core Curriculum to Improve Dissertation Skills in a Doctoral Program

 

Appalachian College Association, 2018 Summit Meeting, Kingsport, TN.

 

September 28, 2018

 

Courtner Co-Presenter - Dr. Andrew Courtner

   

Abstract

The presentation discussed the sequential core, the purpose, assignments, rubrics, and benefits the program faculty have experienced already in the EdD program.

 

Dr. Sylvia Lynch

Lynch

Personal Bio

Dr. Sylvia D. Lynch currently serves as the Dean of the School of Education at LMU. Having served in a variety of leadership roles at LMU, including being the founding principal of LMU’s J. Frank White Academy (JFWA), Dr. Lynch was inducted into JFWA’s Hall of Fame in November 2017. As a writer, Dr. Lynch has published two books of western outlaw history, and her short stories have appeared in a number of anthologies.


Book Title:

Jack Lord: An Acting Life

 

April 2018

 

Abstract

Dr. Lynch’s 277-page biography explores the life and work of actor Jack Lord. Lynch was the first researcher to discover and draw on Lord’s massive personal archive, which Lord had donated to the Cinematic Arts Library at the University of Southern California. The artifacts were exactly as Lord had left them, which gave Lynch a deep and unique insight into what the actor valued and how he approached his work.

 

 

Dr. John McCook

McCook

Personal Bio

Dr. McCook is the Director of the Master of Education Initial Licensure Program and Assistant Professor at Lincoln Memorial University where he teaches research and statistics, educational foundations, special education law, and using data to inform instruction courses. He has authored two books on RTI and serves as a national consultant.


Theriot, C. T., & McCook, J. E. (2019, February). A cautionary tale: Gatekeeping-ethical and legal concerns for counselor supervisors. In T. Remley (Chair), Law and ethics in counseling conference 2019. Symposium conducted at Law and ethics in counseling conference 2019, New Orleans, LA.

 

Theriot Co-Presenter - Dr. Connie Theriot

   

Abstract

A roundtable discussion of the legal and ethical requirements of supervisory personnel in addressing the candidate’s ADA/Section 504 issues and their 14th amendment rights. Establishing written expectations and standards that must be met at each transition point with written appeal rights for the candidates.


McCook, J. E. (2019, February). Independent educational evaluations under the individuals with disabilities education improvement act (IDEIA): A right misunderstood by school districts and private evaluators. In T. Remley (Chair), Law and ethics in counseling conference 2019. Symposium conducted at Bourbon Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA.

    

Abstract

A presentation to school and private counselors and attorneys addressing the legal right to an independent educational evaluation as part of the procedural safeguards under IDEIA. An exploration of the criteria for an educational evaluation for eligibility as opposed to a billable evaluation under DSM V-TR.


McCook, J. E. (2018, December). Special education law: The ultimate guide. In Special education law: The ultimate guide. Symposium conducted at Holiday Inn on the Bay, Portland, ME.

    

Abstract

A workshop to present updates for educators and attorneys on both Section 504 issues and special education interpretations of recent legal opinions. CEU and CLE credits were provided to participants. Special emphasis was centered on the unanimous Endrew F. and Fry v. Napoleon decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court. Discussion also was held on the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals decision in L.H. v Hamilton County.


Bennett, D. S., Billingsley, J. L., Denzel, S., McCook, J. E., Miller, C. N., Sacks, J., & Wilds, S. A. (2018, December). School law expert panel: How to handle your biggest challenges. In School law expert panel: How to handle your biggest challenges. Symposium conducted at Radisson Airport, Nashville, TN.

    

Abstract

A symposium with panel discussions presented by attorneys and me to familiarize the participants on legal issues in education. The panel discussed issues and responded to participant questions on a wide range of legal issues affecting education. The manual developed as a report for participants is listed below. Bennett, D. S., Billingsley, J. L., Denzel, S., McCook, J. E., Miller, C. N., Sacks, J., & Wilds, S. A. (2018). School law expert panel: How to handle your biggest challenges (Publication No. 81236). Eau Claire, WI: NBI.


McCook, J. E. (2018, November). IEPs and 504 plans: A legal compliance guide. In IEPs and 504 plans: A legal compliance guide. Symposium conducted at Hampton Inn Downtown, Salt Lake City, UT.

    

Abstract

A two-day workshop detailing the changes in special education law as well as the updates for the ADA Amendments as they impact Section 504 in educational settings. The audience was composed of attorneys, educators, psychologists and counselors who wished to obtain CEU and CLE credits. Discussion included recent U.S. Supreme Court cases and their impact on providing educational services to students.


McCook, J. E. (2018, November). Special education law from a to z. In Special education law from A to Z. Symposium conducted at Cobb Galleria, Atlanta, GA.

    

Abstract

A two-day workshop training attorney from private practice as well as governmental entities on the updates to both Section 504 and the ADA Amendments. The session also provided training on special education law. The audience was composed of educators, attorneys, counselors and speech language therapists. CLE and CEU credits were awarded.


Douglass, M. E., & McCook, J. E. (2018, November). Special education law: The ultimate guide. In Special education law: The ultimate guide. Symposium conducted at Courtyard by Marriott Manchester-Boston Regional Airport, Manchester, NH.

    

Abstract

A presentation that provided CEU and CLE credit for educators and attorneys on special education practices, legal updates and Section 504. The presentation was interactive as it focused on an overview of changes in the law as well as discussion of applying the law in educational settings. The material was published by National Business Institute. (Douglass, M. E., Grimes, K., & McCook, J. E. (2018). Special Education Law: Special education law: The ultimate guide (Publication No. 80668). Eau Claire, WI: NBI.)


Foster, K. & McCook, J. (2018, October). Building mutually beneficial partnerships in rural     communities: Supporting the implementation of edTPA. Invited presentation at the TPA National   Conference, San Jose, CA.

 

Foster Co-Presenter - Dr. Karen Foster

   

Abstract

This presentation focused on establishing mutually beneficial partnerships that could be adapted to meet the specific needs of the various EPPs and P-12 partners (e.g., those supporting the implementation of edTPA or those serving rural communities). Drs. Foster and McCook shared the steps, mechanisms, and tools involved in establishing the mutually beneficial partnerships.


Support for Candidates who Student Teach in Rural Settings

 

Southeastern Regional Conference edTPA Conference, April 5-7, 2018, Birmingham, Alabama

 

April 7, 2018

 

Foster Co-Presenter - Dr. Karen Foster

   

Abstract

The Educative Assessment and Meaningful Support, 2016 edTPA Administrative Report, released November, 2017, denoted small differences in performance of candidates by demographic subgroups. Candidates who completed student teaching in rural locales had the lowest average scores. The interactive session elicited audience participation in examining factors that might contribute to the lower scores received by candidates who taught in rural settings and identified effective candidate supports.


How Does the Implementation of edTPA Impact Collaborative Partnerships?

 

2018 National Association of Professional Development Schools National Conference, Jacksonville, Florida

 

March 17, 2018

 

Foster Co-Presenter - Dr. Karen Foster

   

Abstract

This presentation encouraged participants to think critically and collaboratively identify structural supports and collaborative changes that impact collaborative school partnerships. Foster and McCook presented what strong EPP/P-12 partnerships look like in states where the successful completion of an edTPA portfolio is required before teachers can become licensed. They also explained the various structural supports necessary to sustain all the participants in the partnerships.


 

“I Am a K-12 Guidance Counselor and I Have Been Assigned Section 504 Duties. Help!”

 

Law and Ethics in Counseling Conference, 3rd Annual, New Orleans, LA

 

January 31, 2018

 

Theriot Co-Presenter - Dr. Connie Theriot

   

Abstract

In many school districts, the responsibility for implementing Section 504 is given to guidance counselors who may have received little if any training regarding the legalities of Section 504. Drs. Theriot and McCook’s session explored the “new” law and its implementation responsibilities.

Dr. Patricia Murphree

Murphree

Personal Bio

Dr. Patricia Murphree received her EdD from the University of Sarasota (Florida).  She worked for 30 years as an educator in Kentucky, Alabama, and Virginia in various roles including a classroom teacher, a school counselor, a school administrator, and the Director of Elementary Education in Lee County, VA.  Dr. Murphree joined the LMU faculty in 2000.


Murphree, P. G., & Gaines, C. B. (2019, September). Metamorphosis from traditional pedagogy to synchronous and asynchronous learning. Lecture presented at the meeting of the Appalachian College Association Summit, Pigeon Forge, TN.


Gaines Co-Presenter - Dr. Cherie Gaines

 

Abstract

This presentation explored the roles of new technology and how it is impacting the traditional classroom by advancing a system called “e-learning”. E-learning can be divided into two categories. Synchronous includes incorporating online learning though video conferencing, webcasts, interactive learning models and chat rooms by supporting learning and teaching through multiple ways of interacting, sharing, collaborating and asking questions in “real-time”. Asynchronous can be offline because it involves coursework delivered through web activities, email, on-line forums, electronic portfolios, and message boards. How may e-learning be incorporated into effective pedagogy? Can e-learning be designed to share pedagogical and/or co-curricular innovations without compromising content rigor? The presentation benefited anyone teaching Generation “Z” students.


Awards

Murphree, P. G. (2019, May). Peaceful secrets. Awarded second place (in the category for poets age 65 and older) for the poem “Peaceful Secrets” published in “Poet’s Playground,” a featured section of The Tennessee Magazine. Published monthly by the Tennessee Electric Cooperative Association, The Tennessee Magazine has a circulation of more than 550,000 around the world and is the most widely circulated monthly publication in the state of Tennessee.


Murphree, P. G. (2019, February). Grief. Awarded second place (in the category for poets age 65 and older) for the poem “Grief” published in “Poet’s Playground,” a featured section of The Tennessee Magazine. Published monthly by the Tennessee Electric Cooperative Association, The Tennessee Magazine has a circulation of more than 550,000 around the world and is the most widely circulated monthly publication in the state of Tennessee.


Murphree, P. G. (2019, March). How do institutions of higher education build teacher leaders? Interactive lecture presented at the Critical Questions in Education Conference, Savannah, GA. 

 

Abstract

The presentation shared insights of teacher leadership based on Lincoln leadership principles. Dr. Murphree and the audience discussed traits of a teacher leader, considered ways to build leadership dispositions, and developed ideas to strengthen university teacher education programs.  Those attending the session also discussed ways to grow leadership and assess student progress.


Murphree, P. G. (2018, September). Integrating creative practice into standards-based Instruction. Interactive lecture presented at the Appalachian College Association Summit Meeting, Kingsport, TN.

    

Abstract

The presentation demonstrated ways to use content in multiple ways for intrinsic motivation and to strengthen student interests through novelty and engagement.  Attendees experienced creative strategies that support standards-based instruction.  The presentation illustrated research-based teaching strategies that integrate the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor domains.


Dr. Alexander Parks

Collins

Personal Bio

Dr. Alexander Parks is Assistant Professor and Chair of the Undergraduate Initial Teacher Licensure program in the Carter & Moyers School of Education at Lincoln Memorial University.  A former middle school literacy teacher in the Washington, DC public school system, Dr. Parks is originally from Columbia, Tennessee and received his undergraduate and master's degrees from the University of Tennessee and his doctorate at the University of Alabama in Curriculum & Instruction and qualitative inquiry.


Parks, A. F. (2019, July). Diverse literary text considerations in K-12 classrooms: Reasons, recommendations and resources. Lecture presented at the 2nd annual meeting of the Smoky Mountain Literacy Council Summer Conference, Knoxville, TN.


Abstract

All students in K-12 schools deserve access to high quality, diverse texts that represent a spectrum of genres, formats, and identities.  Schools are resistant, however, to move beyond the traditional canon in their text considerations used for instruction and many teachers lack a classroom library for students to checkout books.  This session offered participants an overview of the rationale for providing access and using diverse texts with students, as well as provided resources and recommendations. 


Dr. Theresa Stevenson-Parsons

Stevenson

Personal Bio

Dr. Theresa Stevenson-Parsons received her doctorate in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Sarasota in 2001. Her career in Walker County, Georgia as a teacher, curriculum specialist and principal prepared her for her current role as Assistant Professor of Graduate Education. Dr. Stevenson-Parsons is especially interested in literacy, the growth mindset, and student motivation. She loves to read for work/pleasure and wants to inspire teachers to supercharge their personal reading lives.


Stevenson-Parsons, T. (2019, July). Good books and potato chips: Why teachers should be readers. Lecture presented at the 2nd annual meeting of the Smoky Mountain Literacy Council Summer Conference, Knoxville, TN.

    

Abstract

The best teachers are also practitioners. Teachers of reading (or any subject) should also be readers. This presentation encouraged teachers to read for pleasure in a variety of genres, with a wide array of literary conventions and techniques. As teachers wrestle with complex text structures, they will gain an awareness of the challenges faced by young readers. This presentation was full of “good book” recommendations to energize the reading lives of anyone! 


 

Dr. Mark Tichon

Tichon

Personal Bio

Mark Tichon, PhD, is an associate professor at LMU as well as a licensed clinical psychologist. In addition to his teaching responsibilities and research agendas, Dr. Tichon currently directs LMU’s Graduate Education Counseling Program.


Know thyself: Examining Personal Responses to Controversial Issues”

Law and Ethics in Counseling Conference 2017

 

New Orleans, LA

 

Theriot Co-Presenter - Dr. Connie Theriot

   

Abstract

Through use of anonymous audience response software, participants responded to a series of thought-provoking, potentially contentious issues, to uncover and discuss personal biases. Drs. Tichon and Theriot discussed how to minimize possible dissonance or counter-transference caused by the intersectionality of professional practice, personal identity, and client worldview divergent from one’s own

 

Dr. Connie Theriot

Theriot

Personal Bio

Connie T. Theriot, PhD, attained full professor status in Fall 2009. She was Counseling Chair from Fall 1997 to Fall 2006. She was instrumental in both the 1998 and 2004 Tennessee State accrediting process for the School Counseling Program at LMU. Dr. Theriot has received national recognition as a Distinguished Reviewer for the Mental Measurement Yearbook. She continues to present at regional, state and national conferences


England, C. T. (2019).  [Test review of the Receptive, Expressive & Social Communication Assessment-Elementary (RESCA-E)].  In J. F. Carlson, K. F. Geisinger, & J. L. Jonson (Eds.), The twenty-first mental measurements yearbook. Retrieved from the Mental Measurements Yearbook and Tests in Print database.

    

Abstract

Practicing speech–language pathologists developed the Receptive, Expressive & Social Communication Assessment-Elementary (RESCA-E) assessment to provide information about a child's receptive, expressive, and social language development in addition to social communication behaviors. Features and benefits of the RESCA-E are as follows:

  • Assesses the functional features of language (receptive, expressive, social communication core, and social communication inventory) in one instrument.
  • Targets critical areas of language development often included in IEPs and treatment plans but difficult or impossible to objectively measure in elementary-age children.
  • Combines standardized tests and informal observation to give a more complete picture of a child's communication skills.
  • Features colorful drawings and user-friendly administration.
  • Appropriate for children who present with possible language or social–pragmatic deficits.

Theriot, C. T., & McCook, J. E. (2019, February). A cautionary tale: Gatekeeping-ethical and legal concerns for counselor supervisors. In T. Remley (Chair), Law and ethics in counseling conference 2019. Symposium conducted at Law and ethics in counseling conference 2019, New Orleans, LA.

 

McCook Co-Presenter - Dr. John McCook

   

Abstract

A roundtable discussion of the legal and ethical requirements of supervisory personnel in addressing the candidate’s ADA/Section 504 issues and their 14th amendment rights. Establishing written expectations and standards that must be met at each transition point with written appeal rights for the candidates.


Carroll, D. & Theriot, C. (2019, February).  FERPA and HIPAA: How they apply to counselor supervision.  Lecture presented at the annual Law and Ethics in Counseling Conference, New Orleans, LA.

    

Abstract

The purpose of this program was to help counselor education faculty recognize the importance of educating students on the complexities surrounding the legal obligations of these two federal regulations, HIPAA and FERPA.  Misapplication of the proper federal mandate could adversely affect student therapists’ and their supervisors’ legal obligations.


Intersectionality of Title IX, Clery, and FERPA: Implications for Counseling Faculty

American Counseling Association Conference & Expo, 66th Annual, Atlanta, GA

 

April 28, 2018

 

Carroll Co-Presenter - Dr. Doris Carroll (Kansas State University)

 

 Abstract

Title IX prohibits colleges from discriminating on the basis of sex. The Clery Act promotes campus safety by ensuring that community members are well informed about public safety and crime prevention matters. Both involve Family Educational Rights and privacy (FERPA) obligations. This roundtable session discussed Title IX, Cleary, and FERPA Intersectionality. Suggestions were presented that promoted compliance and informed best counseling practices.


 

“Helping Counselor Education Faculty to Recognize the Intersectionality of Title IX, Clery and FERPA: Enhancing Supervision and Promoting Best Practices”

Law and Ethics in Counseling Conference, 3rd Annual, New Orleans, LA

 

January 31, 2018

 

Abstract

The purpose of this presentation was to help counselor education faculty recognize how the intersectionality of Title IX, Clery, and FERPA applied to counseling supervision and research activities. Dr. Theriot also highlighted best practice strategies for counseling faculty in applying these federal guidelines to supervising research and clinical work.


“I Am a K-12 Guidance Counselor and I Have Been Assigned Section 504 Duties. Help!”

Law and Ethics in Counseling Conference, 3rd Annual, New Orleans, LA

 

January 31, 2018

 

McCook Co-Presenter - Dr. John E. McCook

 

Abstract

In many school districts, the responsibility for implementing Section 504 is given to guidance counselors who may have received little if any training regarding the legalities of Section 504. Drs. Theriot and McCook’s session explored the “new” law and its implementation responsibilities.


 

“The Role of the Tennessee School Counselor”

Appalachian College Association, Summit XX, Kingsport, TN

 

September 2017

 

Abstract

Tennessee school counselors follow the American School Counseling Association’s Model (ASCA). Dr. Theriot shared with attendees the duties that are and are not part of the ASCA model. 


Know thyself: Examining Personal Responses to Controversial Issues”

Law and Ethics in Counseling Conference 2017

 

New Orleans, LA

 

Tichon Co-Presenter - Dr. Mark Tichon

 

Abstract

Through use of anonymous audience response software, participants responded to a series of thought-provoking, potentially contentious issues, to uncover and discuss personal biases. Drs. Tichon and Theriot discussed how to minimize possible dissonance or counter-transference caused by the intersectionality of professional practice, personal identity, and client worldview divergent from one’s own

 

Dr. Susan Wagner


Wagner

Personal Bio

Dr. Susan R. Wagner, Associate Professor of Education at Lincoln Memorial University in East Tennessee, completed her PhD at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville in Literacy Studies with a cognate in Adult Education. Dr. Wagner’s career encompasses experience as an elementary teacher, curriculum director, teaching coach, and educational consultant. She has presented at the state, national, and international levels on, self-directed learning; best literacy practices for student achievement; and pedagogical instructional models and strategies for student engagement. 


Wagner, S. R., & Cave, C. (2019, October). Together in the flow: Introducing teacher candidates to reading strategies through face-to-face and online literature circle discussion groups. Lecture presented at the International Literacy Association annual conference, New Orleans, LA.


Wagner Co-Presenters - Dr. Chessica Cave

 

Abstract

As professors of undergraduate and graduate students, we have witnessed students who are disconnected from reading. The Literature Circle model (Daniels, 1994, 2002) follows the parameters of formal cooperative learning models defined by Johnson and Johnson (1989, 2009) where students meet in small groups in order to reach specific learning goals. In our literacy courses, students' groups are formed around selected texts, and discussions are framed through different reading roles. This hands-on workshop demonstrated two methods of incorporating the Literature Circle cooperative learning model into an educator preparation course through face-to-face class meetings or in online learning environments.


Wagner, S. R. (2019, September). Beyond the lesson plan: How collaborative partnerships with educational learning sites builds teacher candidate experience. Lecture presented at the meeting of the Appalachian College Association Summit, Pigeon Forge, TN.

 

Abstract

This presentation detailed a partnership between LMU M.Ed. ITL and two local educational sites for teacher candidates’ real-world preparation in the social studies and science content areas. Partnerships allow candidates to learn about local history and natural science resources through hands-on experiences. Through collaboration with educational sites, graduates can continue these partnerships and establish additional collaborations from their future schools and classrooms.


Wagner, S. R. (2019, July) Reading response letters: Seeing connections and building relationships. Lecture presented at the 2nd annual meeting of the Smoky Mountain Literacy Chapter Summer Conference, Knoxville, TN.

 

Abstract

Atwell (2007, 1987) extended Rosenblatt’s (1978) transactional theory to teaching reading and writing modeled after authentic workshops. Students in Atwell’s classes used dialog journals to describe their reactions and responses to books they read in class. She responded back in turn, asking questions, and providing formative feedback. Recently, the Tennessee Department of Education issued Teaching Literacy in Tennessee and the Tennessee Literacy Framework and the reemphasis on knowledge-based competencies. This  reading response letter-writing strategy, when incorporated as a weekly assignment for students, documents and reveals student’s knowledge and connections while allowing the teacher to provide feedback, praise, and future goals, supporting the move to more conceptual learning in the ELA classroom.


Wagner, S. R. (2019, June) Geocaching: Teaching social studies with technology. Paper presented at the EdMedia and Innovative Learning 2019 Conference, (Virtual Session) Amsterdam, Netherlands.

 

Abstract

Teacher education instructors and classroom teachers can use the Geocaching.com website and mobile app to engage students in learning history and geography. The United States’ emphasis on STEM subjects: Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics often leaves the traditional social studies classes overlooked and underfunded. History and Geography teachers can leverage geocaching technology to motivate their students to learn through engaging online and real-world learning experiences across place and time.


Wagner, S. R. & McCook J. (2019, April). Self-Directed learning of pre-service teacher candidates and correlation to edTPA, Praxis, and teaching performance. Lecture presented at the meeting of Lincoln Memorial University Research Day, Harrogate, TN.

 

Abstract

This project will examine the Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale [SDLRS/LPA] (1977) scores of preservice teachers enrolling into the LMU MEdITL program who must complete required tests to obtain a teaching license in the state of Tennessee. This project proposes using the Self- SDLRS/LPA to find correlations to candidate test scores.


Wagner S. R. (2019, April). Working together: Designing cooperative learning instruction for student engagement and discussion. Lecture presented at the Innovative Teaching and Learning Conference, The University of Tennessee at Knoxville, TN.

 

Abstract

Designing instruction for meaningful engagement with content and peers will increase academic achievement. By transitioning lecture methodology to facilitation of cooperative learning, professors can increase engagement and student achievement. This session introduced research and instructional models supporting cooperative learning in higher education.


Wagner, S. R. & McCook J. (2019-2020). LMU Mini-GrantSelf-Directed Learning of Pre-Service Teacher Candidates and Correlation to edTPA, Praxis, and Teaching Performance.  Lincoln Memorial University. $3,000.

 

Abstract

This project will examine the Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale [SDLRS/LPA] (1977) scores of preservice teachers enrolling into the LMU MEdITL program who must complete required tests to obtain a teaching license in the state of Tennessee. This project proposes using the Self- SDLRS/LPA to find correlations to candidate test scores. 


Wagner, S. R. (2019). Reading Improvement GrantFunding purchase of elementary reading materials for MEdITL teacher candidates’ use in clinical assignments. Literacy Association of Tennessee. $400.

 

Abstract

The Reading Improvement Grant funded the purchase of materials for LMU’s MEd ITL literacy program. These items will be used in support of meeting our instructional goals as part of our Teaching Literacy in Tennessee literacy initiative with Tennessee Department of Education.


Wagner, S. R. (2019, February). Using cooperative models to enhance student learning. Lecture presented at the 10th Annual Transforming Teaching and Learning Environment (Virtual Conference), Moscow, ID.

 

Abstract

This session examined four cooperative learning models to facilitate student engagement and increase achievement. Recognizing differences between cooperative learning models and collaborative assignments which allows instructors to move beyond traditional lecture delivery to more student-centered learning opportunities.


Tennessee Through Time: A Gibbs Smith Education Textbook

 

Abstract

This media-rich textbook is based on Tennessee’s Social Studies Learning Standards. The program includes research-based literary strategies, engaging primary source activities and skill pages, exciting connections between Tennessee’s past and present. The teachers’ edition provides teachers with standards-based lessons and instruction to support the content in the Student Edition.

 

Wagner, S. R. (2019). Governing Tennessee. In C. Kerwin. & B. Brown (Eds.), Tennessee through time teacher’s guide (pp. 62-76). Layton, UT: Gibbs Smith Education.

 

Wagner, S. R. (2019). Tennessee’s economy. In C. Kerwin. & B. Brown (Eds.), Tennessee through time teacher’s guide (pp. 49-61). Layton, UT: Gibbs Smith Education.

 

Wagner, S. R. (2019). Hard times. In C. Kerwin. & B. Brown (Eds.), Tennessee through time teacher’s guide (pp. 33-44). Layton, UT: Gibbs Smith Education.

 

Wagner, S. R. (2019). A Changing Society. In C. Kerwin. & B. Brown (Eds.), Tennessee through time teacher’s guide (pp. 22-32). Layton, UT: Gibbs Smith Education.

 

Wagner, S. R. (2019). A new conflict. In C. Kerwin. & B. Brown (Eds.), Tennessee through time teacher’s guide (pp. 17-21). Layton, UT: Gibbs Smith Education.

 

Wagner, S. R. (2019). Governing Tennessee. In C. Kerwin. & B. Brown (Eds.), Tennessee through time resources and assessments (pp. 62-76). Layton, UT: Gibbs Smith Education.

 

Wagner, S. R. (2019). Tennessee’s economy. In C. Kerwin. & B. Brown (Eds.), Tennessee through time resources and assessments (pp. 49-61). Layton, UT: Gibbs Smith Education.

 

Wagner, S. R. (2019). Hard times. In C. Kerwin. & B. Brown (Eds.), Tennessee through time resources and assessments (pp. 33-44). Layton, UT: Gibbs Smith Education.

 

Wagner, S. R. (2019). A changing society. In C. Kerwin. & B. Brown (Eds.), Tennessee through time resources and assessments (pp. 22-32). Layton, UT: Gibbs Smith Education.

 

Wagner, S. R. (2019). A new conflict. In C. Kerwin. & B. Brown (Eds.), Tennessee through time resources and assessments (pp. 17-21). Layton, UT: Gibbs Smith Education.


Wagner, S. R. (2018, December). Making thinking visible with reading response letters: Seeing connections and building relationships. Lecture presented at the Literacy Association of Tennessee Annual Conference. Murfreesboro, TN.

 

Abstract

Incorporating examples from student letters, literacy teachers examined how the Reading Response Letter strategy reveals student understandings about the texts they read. This literacy strategy provides evidence for knowledge-based competencies and allows the teacher to provide formative feedback while building relationships to motivate reading.

 


Wagner, S. R., Jenkins, B., Morris, R., Pardue, B, & Turner, W. R. (2018, December). Reading strategies: A Pecha Kucha experience. Lecture presented at the Literacy Association of Tennessee Annual Conference. Murfreesboro, TN.

 

Abstract

Using the Pecha Kucha 20 slides/20 seconds each slide format, LMU literacy professor and graduate students present five reading strategies to inform literacy instruction, support comprehension and guide assessment. Graduate students present on strategies they have researched and implemented in clinical settings.  

 


Wagner, S. R. (2018). The self-directed learning practices of elementary teachers. International Journal of Self-Directed Learning, 15(2), 18-33.

 

Abstract

A two phase, mixed methods design examined teacher self-directed learning using the Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale [SDLRS/LPA] (1977). Teacher self-directed learning included characteristics that research has found to be essential for successfully implemented professional development that results in improved student achievement.

 


Wagner, S. R. (2018, June). Using cooperative learning models to enhance student group assignments. Lecture presented at The Teaching Professor Conference, Atlanta, GA.

 

Abstract

Cooperative learning models facilitate student engagement, increase student achievement, and provide a framework for carefully designed in-class collaborative learning. Recognizing differences in cooperative learning models and assigned group work, or out-of-class projects, is essential to creating effective collaborative learning, which allows instructors to move from traditional lecture models. This session presented four cooperative learning models for implementing cooperative learning.

 


Wagner, S. R. (2018, February). Cooperative learning models: Moving beyond group work in higher education. Lecture presented at the Conference on Higher Education Pedagogy [CIDER] at Virginia Tech, VA.

 

Abstract

The cooperative learning model targets higher order thinking, student engagement with content, and academic achievement; however, in college courses, where lecture is the default instructional method, cooperative learning can be problematic. Dr. Wagner’s research examined elements of four true cooperative models used at the university level—models designed to be used during class meetings in order to engage students and increase student achievement.


Wagner, S. R. (2018, February). Self-directed learning of elementary teachers. Paper presented at the Symposium for the International Self-Directed Learning Symposium conducted at Cocoa Beach, FL.

 

Abstract

Prescribed professional development often falls short of teachers’ needs. Research suggests that teacher self-directed learning may simultaneously meet teachers’ PD needs and improve student achievement. Dr. Wagner’s research identified elementary teachers who were above average in self-directed learning and engaged in learning activities that maximized their professional/creative selves. Dr. Wagner presented her model for self-directed learning and discussed implications of teacher-directed professional development.

 

 

 

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