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Projects

CIVET Projects in Progress

Have an idea for collaboration? Share it with the CIVET Director, Katherine Fogelberg, at [email protected].

  •   HUNT JA, HEYDENBURG M, ANDERSON, SL, THOMPSON RR. VETERINARY STUDENTS’ USE OF A NON-IMMERSIVE VIRTUAL REALITY APPLICATION IN PREPARATION FOR THEIR FIRST SURGICAL PERFORMANCE.

    Does reviewing a surgical procedure in VR improve a student' surgical performance?

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  •   SIMONS MC, COLLINGSWORTH W. DEVELOPING A LOW FIDELITY GI MODEL FOR VETERINARY SURGICAL EDUCATION.

    To date various GI models are lacking in the appropriate texture and layering to adequately teach the tactile skills need for GI surgery. We seek to develop a more realistic GI model.

  •   ROWE J, FOGELBERG K, BUTTERBRODT P. EVALUATION OF PERFORMANCE IN UNDERGRADUATE COURSES AS A SURROGATE MEASURES OF SPATIAL REASONING AND PRE-MATRICULATION INDICATORS OF ACADEMIC DIFFICULTY IN ANATOMY COURSES.

    There is evidence to suggest that performance in anatomy relates to spatial reasoning skills. There is also evidence, albeit more limited, that spatial reasoning skills influence performance in certain prerequisite courses (e.g. organic chemistry, physics, etc.). Are performance outcomes in these courses viable surrogates for assessments of spatial reasoning ability, and if so, are they predictive for success in the professional anatomy curriculum?

  •   HUNT JA, SCHMIDT P, PERKINS J, NEWTON G. COMPARISON OF THREE CANINE MODELS FOR TEACHING VETERINARY DENTAL CLEANING.

    How realistic does a dental model need to be in order to teach veterinary students to perform a dental cleaning? How much fidelity, or realism, is worth paying for?

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  •   GIBBONS PM, ANDERSON S, ROBERTSON S, HUNT JA. EVALUATION OF AN EVIDENCE-BASED VETERINARY MEDICINE CURRICULUM FOR INSTRUCTION IN CLINICAL YEAR OF VETERINARY MEDICINE PROGRAM.

    To what extent does a clinical year journal club exercise improve students’ knowledge and understanding of evidence-based veterinary medicine? Does their understanding last until graduation from veterinary school?

  •   SIMONS MC, ANDERSON SL, HUNT J. VETERINARY SURGICAL EDUCATION: A REVIEW. WHERE HAVE WE BEEN AND WHERE ARE WE GOING?

    A review article documenting the history, current trends, and future directions of veterinary surgical education.

  •   HUNT JA, ANDERSON S, ET AL. QUANTIFYING SURGICAL TISSUE HANDLING OF VETERINARY STUDENTS, PRACTITIONERS, AND SURGEONS.

    Can tissue handling be assessed using small fingertip sensors? Could this method give us a way to track the development of students’ tissue handling—and investigate interventions designed to improve it—in the future?

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  •   ROWE J, FOGELBERG K. EVALUATION OF FACTORS INFLUENCING PARTICIPATION IN AN OPTIONAL LABORATORY-INTENSIVE SUMMER COURSE DESIGNED TO INTRODUCE STUDENTS TO THE PROFESSIONAL ANATOMY CURRICULUM.

    The CVM Anatomy Boot Camp is an optional summer course designed to provide a preview of the upcoming anatomy course and develop dissection skills. In theory, the impacts of such a course would most benefit students that had never taken an anatomy course or who had performed marginally in previous anatomy courses. That said, the course is entirely optional and open to all incoming students at present. Are we reaching the intended audience? If not, what could be done to do so more effectively?

  •   FOGELBERG K, SIMONS MC. USING PHOTOVOICE TO EXPLORE THE IMPACTS OF INTERNATIONAL PUBLIC HEALTH WORK ON AMERICAN VETERINARY STUDENTS.

    Veterinarians are increasingly interested in and capable of working internationally and a number of international opportunities exist today. However, there is little research published about the impacts such work has on those doing the work and how it affects their cultural competence/sensitivity, career goals, and aspirations. This study proposes to use photovoice, a community-based participatory research method, to investigate the impacts of international veterinary public health work on fourth year veterinary student externs who have signed up for a 4-week long elective rotation to be completed in Kenya.

  •   FOGELBERG K. ONLINE SURVEY TO GAUGE INTEREST OF VETERINARY PROFESSIONALS LEARNING ABOUT EDUCATION.

    Veterinary medical education has lagged behind human medical education for decades but is now increasingly becoming a focus within the profession. LMU-CVM is a leader in this area and would like to gauge interest levels of veterinary professionals in learning more about veterinary education. The target population is veterinarians in non-academic positions and results will help LMU-CVM determine the viability of providing online continuing education (CE) opportunities focused on veterinary education. We anticipate results will also help us refine topics and delivery platforms to ensure the widest reach possible for subsequent CE sessions.

  •   ANDERSON S, HUNT JA, ET AL. IDEAL INSTRUCTOR TO STUDENT RATIO IN SURGICAL SKILLS TRAINING LABORATORY SESSIONS.

    What is the ideal instructor to student ratio for teaching veterinary suturing skills?

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  •   ROWE J, FOGELBERG K. INTEREST, PERCEPTIONS, AND IMPACTS ON LEARNING RELATED TO SUPPLEMENTAL EDUCATIONAL EVENTS USING OIL-BASED CLAY AND PURPOSE-BUILT MODELS TO CONSTRUCT ANATOMICAL STRUCTURES.

    By the time students reach clinical courses in their third courses, they have forgotten much of what they had previously learned in first-year anatomy. Does clay modeling offer an effective review to regain a portion of that knowledge? Will students elect to attend optional reviews using the technique and what impacts their decisions? Will students enjoy the activity and what factors (e.g. artistic ability, baseline knowledge retention, etc.) relate to their perceptions?

  •   FOGELBERG K. EFFECTS OF COMPUTER ADAPTIVE STUDY AIDS ON STUDENT LEARNING IN SPECIFIC COURSES ACROSS THE PRE-CLINICAL VETERINARY CURRICULUM.

    There is plenty of anecdotal evidence that veterinary students are unable or unwilling to engage in the deep learning faculty desire and the veterinary profession demands for success. Some of this may be attributed to the students themselves, while much of it is likely due to the overwhelming amount of information thrown at students during the pre-clinical years of the curriculum, as noted by sparse research into this topic. The oft-used “firehose” analogy continues to be a fitting one for students in the pre-clinical veterinary curriculum, and while this may never fully cease, we should be looking for ways to at least mitigate the water flow so that students are no longer drowning. To study the effects of computer adaptive learning aids on students in veterinary school requires veterinary students.

  •   FOGELBERG K, SIMONS M, BUTTERBRODT P, JOLLEY K. ASSESSING THE POTENTIAL BENEFITS OF INCORPORATING COMPUTER ADAPTIVE TESTING IN THE VETERINARY CURRICULUM.

    This study looks to pilot the use of a computer adaptive exam with the veterinary students in the pre-clinical years of the veterinary curriculum. Specifically, we desire to 1. Establish whether CAT decreases overall student testing time and is still accurate in its student achievement stratification; 2. Establish whether CAT decreases overall student testing time and is still accurate in its student achievement stratification; and 3. Determine if CAT is a viable delivery platform for testing veterinary medical students.

  •   ANDERSON S, ET AL. DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF AN EQUINE NASOGASTRIC INTUBATION MODEL.

    Which of the nasal passageways leads to the pharynx and then to the esophagus? Can this model teach students how to pass a nasogastric tube correctly without using a live horse?

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  •   ANDERSON S, HUNT JA, ET AL. IMPACT OF VETERINARY STUDENT SURGICAL SKILLS REMEDIATION PROGRAM ON SUBSEQUENT LIVE ANIMAL SURGICAL PERFORMANCE.

    When a student fails to meet a performance standard but after re-training, passes their remediation, do their surgical skills remain on par with their classmates, or do they continue to have weak skills over the long term?

  •   SIMONS MC, COLLINGSWORTH W, NADAR P. INVESTIGATING THE EFFICACY AND FEASIBILITY OF SOFT EMBALMING CANINE AND FELINE CADAVERS.

    Common formalin-based embalming techniques yield less than satisfactory results for both anatomic dissection and surgical training, and also pose health concerns with chronic exposure. Our human counterparts have started exploring and using soft embalming techniques to address these issues. This study will investigate whether a soft embalming technique is efficacious and feasible for veterinary medical education purposes.

  •   FOGELBERG, K. STUDENT PERCEPTIONS OF CASE-BASED LEARNING DELIVERY METHODS

    The use of case-based learning (CBL) in veterinary medicine has waxed and waned over the decades; we are currently in a cycle that leans towards its use in the classroom. However, the majority of the veterinary education literature appraises the effectiveness of CBL from the instructor-perspective using either formative or summative information retrieved from students during and at the conclusion of the course where CBL has been used. This study will investigate vet students’ perspectives of varying CBL delivery techniques via end of session questionnaires during the fourth semester of the veterinary curriculum.