Image

Master of Veterinary Education

MVEd Logo

The College of Veterinary Medicine of Lincoln Memorial University is dedicated to preparing professional educators of distinction who embody the three core ideals of Values, Education, and Service in candidates who:

Demonstrate the dispositions of the education and veterinary professions. Articulate and demonstrate the knowledge base of moral, social and political dimensions, which will impact individual students, the veterinary profession, and communities for the enrichment of human society, animals, and the environment.
Demonstrate the teaching skills and learning strategies acquired through rigorous academic studies and active engagement in real life clinical experiences in an educational veterinary setting.
Promote lifelong learning through continued professional development, research, and scholarship.
Assist in meeting the educational needs of the veterinary profession and the One Health focus of animals, humans, and the environment.
Articulate an understanding that veterinary students come with a variety of background knowledge and skills, as well as demonstrate the dispositions to serve and teach diverse student populations.

View our brochure here.

*Current cost of the program is $490/credit hour for the 2021-2022 academic year.

 

 Admission Requirements

All applicants should completed the application, a brief essay and all other application requirements. Application requirements vary please select the option below that currently describes you to learn more.

  •  All Applicants (regardless of current level of education)

    - Complete the application

    - Transcripts (once admitted, official transcripts required)

    - Letters of recommendation (2)

    - Full CV

    - $50 application fee required (please pay to Cashier at 423.869.6336 once application is confirmed by LMU-CVM Office of Admissions)

    - Statement of Intent - Include a double spaced, <750 word response to the following statement

    Tell us about your motivation to obtain a Master of Veterinary Education degree, how your background and training to this point have prepared you to earn a graduate degree in education, and explain how and why this degree will help you in your career aspirations.

  •  DVM/VMD (or equivalent), MS/MA, and/or PhD in a field OTHER than education

    - minimum 2.5/4.0 veterinary school GPA; minimum 3.0/4.0 master’s/PhD GPA

    - completed application, including unofficial veterinary/graduate school transcripts, letters of recommendation (2), and statement of interest, full CV + $50 application fee required

    - official transcripts from all universities attended needed after acceptance and prior to matriculation

  •  Licensed or Registered Veterinary Technicians

    - Minimum education required = BS or BA or equivalent first university-level degree

    - Undergraduate GPA: recommend minimum 3.0 or higher, but no required minimum and each applicant will be reviewed holistically

    - completed application, including unofficial transcripts from undergraduate degree program, letters of recommendation (min 2, max 3), statement of interest, full CV and $50 application fee

    - official transcripts from all universities attended needed after acceptance and prior to matriculation

  •  English as a Second Language or Foreign Students

    - TOEFL – IBT –minimum of 80

    - IELTS – minimum of 6.5

    - completed application, including unofficial veterinary school transcripts, letters of recommendation (2), statement of interest, full CV + $50 application fee required

    - official transcripts from all universities attended needed after acceptance and prior to matriculation

 Curriculum

The MVEd curriculum can be completed in as little as two years with full time study and three to four years with part time study.

  •  Semester 1 (fall)
    •  MVE 610 | Theories of Learning and Instruction

      This course provides the building blocks of understanding for and applications of educational philosophy and theories to the veterinary school classroom.  It examines various learning theorists and their theories of learning, the history of learning and learning theories, the current research in education, and evidence-based practices of instruction. (3 credits)

      Students will:

      ·       Describe a variety of learning theories and theorists, particularly those that have been the most enduring and influential in education.

      ·       Identify at least three evidence-based practices and explicitly connect each to a specific learning theory.

      ·       Explore and report on one learning theory in detail, including latest research.

      ·       Create a personal teaching philosophy using knowledge obtained in the course.

    •  MVE 611 | Application of and Innovations in Educational Technology

      This course exposes candidates to hardware and software available for educational management purposes in veterinary education, discusses innovations in veterinary education (new models, technological applications and advances, and instructional innovations), and provides basic information about different types of learning management systems (LMS).   (2 credits)

      Students will:

      ·       Identify at least three clinical assessment software programs (e.g. Turning Point) and give examples of how they could be used to record assessments of clinical skills.

      ·       Use a Learning Management System to design the implementation for a course, including posting a syllabus, using an assessment or survey tool, a discussion board, a place to submit assignments, and a communication process for students to contact faculty within the LMS.

      ·       Describe how modeling could influence the delivery of veterinary education and affect animal usage (e.g. physical models, virtual reality).

      ·       Based on a clinical skills module of choice, create a just in time clinical skills model from available resources to supplement the module.

      ·       Explore industry innovations and how they could affect the delivery of veterinary medical care (e.g. point of care diagnostics, wearable devices, telemed) and veterinary education (e.g. voice user interfaces and self-directed learning).

    •  MVE 612 | Instructional Methods for Lectures, Labs and Clinical Supervision

      This course explores a variety of instructional methods to use in lecture, hands-on clinical lab, and  active veterinary clinic/hospital settings. (3 credits)

      Students will:

      ·       Identify their own educational experiences and the instructional methods to which they responded

      ·       Identify at least five methods of instruction that could be used in a lecture setting

      ·       Identify at least five methods of instruction that could be used in a lab setting

      ·       Compare and contrast the methods used in a classroom/lab setting versus an active veterinary clinic/hospital setting

      ·       Create a lesson for a specific lecture and a lab, indicating where different instructional methods are used and justify whether or not such methods could also be effectively used in an active veterinary clinic/hospital setting

      ·       Record a video of a lesson being taught by the student, post online, and give peer review feedback

      ·       Describe ways to assess instruction in a lecture, lab, and active veterinary clinic/hospital setting

      Prerequisite: MVE 610 or concurrent

  •  Semester 2 (spring)
    •  MVE 613 | Andragogy, Professional Education, and the 21st Century Student

      This course examines the culture, educational, and social experiences of millennials and Gen Z.  Veterinary Education as a professional program is explored.  Also discussed is the adult learner and identifying theories and evidenced-based research in reaching the 21st century adult learner (3 credits)

      Students will:

      ·       Identify social and educational background of 21st century veterinary students

      ·       Describe how this background affects choices in instructional and assessment methods

      ·       Define and describe andragogy compared to pedagogy

      ·       Compare and contrast professional education with general education

      Prerequisite: MVE 610

    •  MVE 614 | Assessing Student Learning in Veterinary Medicine

      This course explores various manners of assessing student learning, knowledge, and abilities, including but not limited to written and oral exams, group and individual projects, written essays or papers, poster presentations, case presentations, OSCEs, self and peer evals (3 credits)

      Students will:

      ·       Identify characteristics of measurable student learning objectives

      ·       Explain different methods of assessment for lecture courses and for lab courses

      ·       Identify characteristics of a psychometrically sound exam question

      ·       Create a rubric for a performance assessment for a veterinary clinical task or skill

      ·       Create a plan of assessment for an overall course including percentages

      Prerequisite: MVE 610, 612

    •  MVE 615* | Research Methods in Education/Research and Statistics

      *cross listed as EDUC 511

      This course examines research methodologies and basic statistical approaches. Research skills including but not limited to information retrieval, critical evaluation, report organization, and statistical methodology are developed and reflected in formal research proposals. (3 credits)

      Students will:

      ·       Demonstrate understanding of different qualitative and quantitative research methods used in education

      ·       Create a viable research study focused on veterinary education using

      ·       Accurately interpret results of research studies and analyze the quality of published qualitative and quantitative studies

      Prerequisite: MVE 610

  •  Semester 3 (fall)
    •  MVE 616 | Curriculum Development in Veterinary Education

      This course explores the clinical and professional requirements of a veterinarian and how to create and deploy curricular content to students so they graduate as competent and confident Day One veterinarians. (2 credits)

      Students will:

      ·       Using information from at least three veterinary college curricula, create an initial curriculum for a new veterinary school program

      ·       Describe the value and uses of syllabi in a degree program

      ·       Differentiate between learning objectives, learning outcomes, and competencies and be able to apply each appropriately within a course/curriculum

      ·       Complete a project related specifically to an area of interest in both veterinary medicine and veterinary school curriculum

      Prerequisite: MVE 610, 615

    •  MVE 617 | Educational Leadership in Veterinary Education

      This course explores current trends in veterinary education and in leadership, and how to improve one’s own leadership skills to be highly effective and successful leaders in veterinary education. (3 credits)

      Students will:

      ·       Describe theories of leadership from a historical perspective

      ·       Identify characteristics of successful leaders using the trait theory

      ·       Report on leaders in their own experience who were successful and who were not

      ·       Identify their own leadership traits using a research-based survey

      ·       Identify a specific current issue that an educational leader in veterinary education faces and how they would approach the solution as a leader

    •  MVE 618 | Interprofessional Education, International Veterinary Education, and Diversity

      This course will focus on interprofessional education (IPE), on international veterinary education, and on the role of diversity in education (3 credits)

      Students will:

      ·       Identify resources to stay current with human cultural and diversity issues as related to their effects on education

      ·       Discuss cultural differences that could affect student participation or performance in lectures and labs

      ·       Research and report on various global veterinary educational models

      ·       Research and report on interprofessional programs in higher education

      ·       Design an IPE communications or clinical skills scenario (e.g. rescue scenario)

  •  Semester 4 (spring)
    •  MVE 619 | Student Services and Mentoring Students

      This course is an exploration of the services offered through Student Services, the policies and procedures, rules and regulations for student mentorship.

      Students will:

      For student services:

      ·       Identify the general university-wide student services activities in a selected university

      ·       Identify veterinary-student-specific needs, academic and otherwise, not met by the university SS department

      ·       Give at least four examples of ways student services can help provide academic assistance to struggling veterinary students

      ·       Explain how an on-campus club comes into existence and its responsibilities

      ·       Describe at least five formal student clubs/organizations/groups at a veterinary school, including their functions, and describe the duties of faculty/staff sponsors for the groups

      ·       Describe a unique student services program to address well-being of veterinary students

      ·       Identify staff/resources that would be/is needed to meet the program described above

      For academic and life mentoring:

      ·       Identify policies and procedures that must be followed, including FERPA, HIPPA, IRB, IACUC, biosecurity, and other legal issues that must be addressed

      ·       Identify ADA regulations, limitations, and ability to effectively perform veterinary skills

      ·       Identify parameters for faculty advisors, including addressing professionalism issues

      ·       Be able to identify serious legal, physical, mental, or personal issues that could affect a student’s academic or personal life, and create a list of resources available for various student needs

      ·       Discuss professional and ethical issues in student mentoring

    •  MVE 620 | Capstone Project or Thesis

      This course serves as a demonstration of the content the candidate has learned over the duration of the program. 

      Students will:

      Research, design, and present a topic of interest or relevance to their work through a medium that may include a formal thesis, preparation of a paper for publication, development of a pilot program, creation of a training video, or other terminal project related to veterinary education.  The final deliverable and project must be approved by the course director or student’s faculty advisor.

    •  Electives
      •  MVE 631 | On-Site Education Technology Development

        This course offers an in-depth look at technology as applied to veterinary education, including an introduction to digital imaging, model design, CAD software and 3-D printing, and model validation (2 cr)

        ·       Describe activities and instructional methods for presenting professional and clinical skills

        ·       Identify the steps in creating a model in a 3-D printer and apply this to create a model

        ·       Apply technological modalities to creation of educational materials

        ·       Design and build a clinical skills model

      •  MVE 632 | Program Assessment in Veterinary Education

        In this course students learn about assessing the assessments, curriculum, facilities, instructional personnel, rotation program, staff, and overall educational program at a veterinary school  (3 cr)

        Students will:

        ·       Identify the parts of a veterinary education program and their functions

        ·       Describe measurable goals for each part and ways to assess these

        ·       Explain institutional program assessment for a selected university

        ·       Research and describe the accreditation process of the AVMA

        ·       Complete a written report as for an accrediting body on one section of the AVMA accreditation

      •  MVE 633 | Principles of Higher Education Administration

        This course offers an overview of administrative duties and responsibilities in running an education program such as a college of veterinary medicine. (3 cr)

        ·       Describe the relationship between a college of veterinary medicine and its parent university

        ·       Identify the administrators and departments in a CVM, describe their duties and responsibilities and faculty and staff needed to carry out these duties

        ·       Create a possible administrative unit for the CVM, identify its duties and responsibilities, and explain why each position would be required/desired on the board

        ·       Discuss budgetary needs, resource allocations, and alternative funding sources

        ·       Describe legal, ethical, and professional issues facing college administrators

      •  MVE 634 | Higher Education Systems and Policies

        This course offers an overview of administrative duties and responsibilities in running an education program such as a college of veterinary medicine. (3 cr)

        ·       Describe the relationship between a college of veterinary medicine and its parent university

        ·       Identify the administrators and departments in a CVM, describe their duties and responsibilities and faculty and staff needed to carry out these duties

        ·       Create a possible administrative unit for the CVM, identify its duties and responsibilities, and explain why each position would be required/desired on the board

        ·       Discuss budgetary needs, resource allocations, and alternative funding sources

        ·       Describe legal, ethical, and professional issues facing college administrators

      •  MVE 635 | Supervising Research in Veterinary Education

        This course provides the student an opportunity to create and manage a veterinary education research project that involves supervision and mentoring of veterinary students.  Its goal is to have students identify the role of the veterinary student in scientific and academic research as well as be able to explain the processes involved in obtaining permission to research and acquire research funding. (2 SCH)

        Students will:

        ·       Identify a topic of interest in veterinary education or scientific research

        ·       Identify a hypothesis and the parameters for the study as well as any necessary legalities (IACUC, IRB, etc.)

        ·       Identify how the vet student could be involved in the study, from designing to funding to gathering data to running statistical analysis to publishing

        ·       Present the entire research concept including how student participation would be measured and assessed

        Prerequisite: MVE 615