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Course Descriptions

Course Descriptions

Year One

Fall 2020 - Spring 2021

  •  Semester One

    CVM 710 | Veterinary Anatomy I

    (37 lecture hours + 76 lab hours = 5 credits)

    A systemic and topographic study of macroscopic body structure is presented via lecture and laboratory. This course utilizes the dog and cat as the primary models for the study of general mammalian form; however, the anatomical information learned may be applied (with varying degrees of modification) to essentially all domestic mammals as well as many exotic species. A team approach is used for laboratory dissection. Clinical applications are incorporated throughout the course in alignment with the goal of contributing to the education of a practitioner.

     

    CVM 711 | Veterinary Physiology I

    (83 lecture hours = 5.5 credits)

    The CVM 711 course is a detailed study of cellular, tissue, organ function and their control and integration in animals.  Emphasis will be placed on cardiovascular, endocrine, nervous, muscular, respiratory, renal, digestive, and reproductive physiology. The basic physical and chemical principles that underlie physiological processes will be described.

     

    CVM 712 | Veterinary Histology

    (30 lab hours = 1 credit)

    This course is a series of laboratories designed to develop the necessary skills to identify microscopic anatomy of basic cell types, tissues, organs, and organ systems. Principles learned in this course will be applied in simultaneous and subsequent courses in the CVM curriculum.

     

    CVM 714 | One Health I

    (8 lecture hours = .5 credit)

    This course will focus on the aspects of One Health that relate to the individual and professional foundations of veterinary medicine.  It will include the history of veterinary medicine to introduce them to their professional cultural inheritance, human animal bond, animal welfare, the role of animals in human psychosocial health, professional ethics and jurisprudence, work life balance, professional organizations and future opportunities for veterinarians.

     

    CVM 715 | Clinical Skills

    (30 lab hours = 1 credit)

    Students will be taught safe handling and restraint techniques and will be introduced to the general physical examination of various domestic animal species, including small animals (dogs & cats), companion animals (horses) and production animals (cows & small ruminants). Students will also be introduced to psychomotor skills needed for surgery and other clinical procedures.

     

    CVM 717 | Applied Anatomy and Physiology

    (15 lectures = 1 credit)

    This course is designed to help students develop their skills in critical thinking, communication, resource identification and evaluation, and clinical decision-making through small group management of a hypothetical veterinary case Through case-based learning, students will revisit and apply knowledge from previous courses as well as preview the application and interpretation of content from upcoming semesters. Students will maintain any and all appropriate medical records during the management of the case.

     

    CVM 718 | Professional Skills

    (2 lecture hours + 26 lab hours = 1 credit)

    Students will be introduced to professional communication skills and their importance in veterinary medicine. Students will be introduced & exposed to the Calgary Cambridge Guide for client consultation and key components to support it.  Students will demonstrate these skills in simulated client interactions.

     

    CVM 719 | Medical Science

    (15 lecture hours = 1 credit)

    This course will provide a foundation of general medical knowledge required of a veterinarian.  Subjects will include: medical terminology, medical chemistry, medical math, and medical physics.

  •  Semester Two

    CVM 713 | Parasitology

    (43 lectures + 6 lab hours = 3 credits)

    This course teaches principles of parasitology, including etiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment and control of selected parasitic diseases in animals. Students will gain knowledge of life cycle biology, transmission strategies, and natural hosts of major parasites of animals.

     

    CVM 716 | Research Methods in Veterinary Medicine

    (8 lecture hours = 0.5 credit)

    This course will introduce students to the methods in biomedical research. Students will gain basic understanding of literature search, critical evaluation of scientific publications, hypothesis development, experimental design, data analysis, use of animals in research, IACUC, IRB, communication of research findings (written and verbal formats), and grant writing.

     

    CVM 722 | Veterinary Immunology

    (30 lecture hours = 2 credits)

    The primary goal of this course is to provide students with an understanding of basic mechanisms of veterinary immunology, thereby giving them the tools to keep up with developments in the field and help in solving clinical immunological problem throughout their careers.

     

    CVM 723 | Veterinary Infectious Disease

    (60 lecture hours = 4 credits)

    The primary goal of this course is to introduce students to important infectious diseases of animals and help them develop a conceptual framework that can be adapted to incorporate novel approaches that they will encounter during their veterinary medical careers.

     

    CVM 724 | One Health II

    (15 lecture hours = 1 credit)

    This course introduces the basic concepts of epidemiology and biostatistics as applied to veterinary and One Health problems. Emphasis is placed on the principles and methods of epidemiologic investigation, epidemiologic definitions, appropriate summaries and displays of data, and the use of classical statistical approaches to describe the health of populations. Topics include the dynamic behavior of disease; usage of rates, ratios and proportions, odds ratios, and other statistical tools. Various epidemiologic study designs for investigating associations between risk factors and disease outcomes are also introduced, culminating with criteria for causal inferences. The application of these disciplines in the areas of health services, screening, and environment policy are presented. The influence of epidemiology and biostatistics on legal and ethical issues are also discussed.  Critical review of scientific literature will be examined.  To the extent possible, we will draw from the Appalachian region for examination of issues.

     

    CVM 725 | Clinical Skills II

    (30 lab hours = 1 credit)

    Students will be taught basic ligatures and suturing techniques, phlebotomy, intramuscular injection and subcutaneous injection techniques using models and live animals. Students will perform physical examinations of canine, equine, bovine and ovine species and be introduced to the Subjective, Objective, Assessment and Plan (SOAP) format for medial record keeping.

     

    CVM 726 | Animal Husbandry and Welfare

    (15 lecture hours = 1 credit)

    *Course description forthcoming*

     

    CVM 727 | Applications of Infectious Diseases

    (15 lecture hours = 1 credit)

    *Course description forthcoming*

     

    CVM 728 | Professional Skills II

    (2 lecture hours + 26 lab hours = 1 credit)

    Students will be introduced to professional communication skills and their importance in veterinary medicine. Students will be exposed to the following: Four Core Communication Skills, Imposter/ Perfectionist Syndrome, Diversity in Veterinary Medicine & Emotional Intelligence. Students will demonstrate these skills in simulated client interactions.

     

    CVM 729 | Medical Science II

    (15 lecture hours = 1 credit)

    *Course description forthcoming*

Year Two

Fall 2020- Spring 2021

  •  Semester Three

    CVM 730 | Veterinary General Pathology I

    (45 lecture hours = 3 credits)

    The first half of this course will introduce the student to general pathology of all organ systems. The second half of this course covers systemic pathology of domestic animals. Students will apply knowledge from previous courses (anatomy, histology, physiology, parasitology, immunology, and infectious disease) with the new knowledge of general pathology to describe the pathogenesis of and diagnose diseases.

     

    CVM 733 | Clinical Pathology

    (56 lecture hours + 8 lab hours = 4 credits)

    This course explains pathophysiologic mechanisms responsible for abnormal findings in hematologic, biochemical, urinalysis and cytologic tests in health and disease of animals. Students will learn a selection of appropriate diagnostic tests for various diseases and how to interpret the results of these tests. They will learn basic principles of laboratory medicine including quality control, reference intervals, specificity, sensitivity and positive and negative predictive values.

     

    CVM 734 | One Health III

    (30 lecture hours = 2 credits)

    This course will introduce the concepts of distribution, diagnosis, treatment, and control of zoonotic diseases and transboundary diseases.  It will draw from knowledge gained in with courses regarding infectious agents, immune system, pathophysiology, clinical pathology, and parasitology.  The course will examine the One Health aspects of disease and the interrelatedness between individual and population human health, animal health, and the environment. Included will be student team literature search, critical literature analysis and presentations. Student will complete phase one of the United States Department of Agriculture Initial Accreditation Training.

     

    CVM 735 | Clinical Skills III

    (45 lab hours = 1.5 credits)

    Continued development of expertise in handling and interpretation of general physical examination findings in large animals (equine, bovine, small ruminants), exotics/birds and small animals. Continued progress toward mastery of psychomotor skills for surgery including catheter placement, closure of abdominal incisions, gloving techniques and clamping/ligating. Introduction of basic diagnostic techniques.

     

    CVM 737 | Intro to Surgery

    (30 lecture hours = 2 credits)

    This course will cover principles of surgery, including aseptic technique, fracture healing, perioperative patient care, and basic principles of surgical procedures and techniques. Application of anatomic knowledge to surgical approaches will also be included.

     

    CVM 738 | Professional Skills III

    (3 lecture hours + 22 lab hours = 1credit)

    Students will be introduced & exposed to additional professional communication skills and their importance in veterinary medicine. Students will be exposed to further skills in the Calgary Cambridge Guide for client consultation and key components to support it.  Students will demonstrate these skills in simulated client interactions.

     

    CVM 740 | Veterinary Systemic Pathology

    (45 lecture hours = 3 credits)

    This course serves as a continuation of CVM 730: Veterinary Pathology I.  The pathophysiology of diseases will be covered for the musculoskeletal, respiratory, CNS, integumentary, and ophthalmic systems of domestic animals. 

  •  Semester Three | Elective Courses

    CVM 769-M | Veterinary Disaster Medicine Elective

    (6 lecture hours + 8 lab hours = 1 credit)

    This course will introduce the concepts and issues involved in veterinary disaster medicine at the local, national and international level. Case studies, table top exercises and hands-on laboratories will be used to train in basic response processes and techniques. Online Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) courses will used to build background training

  •  Semester Four

    CVM 732 | Toxicology

    (21 lecture hours + 3 lab hours = 1.5 credits)

    This course is an introduction to principles of toxicology in domestic animals. The student will learn basic principles of veterinary toxicology and learn how to locate toxicological information.  The course will present some common toxicants of chemicals and plants (focusing on those found in North America) affecting domestic animals and to learn basic approaches to treatment of poisoned animals.

     

    CVM 736 | Veterinary Nutrition

    (28 lecture hours + 4 lab hours = 2 credits)

    This course is a comprehensive overview of domestic animal nutrition, including digestion and metabolism of nutrients, feedstuffs and feeding, ration formulation, and the interaction of nutrition and disease for small animals, horses and food animals. Clinical nutrition aspects will be focused upon.

     

    CVM 741 | Clinical Pharmacology

    (30 lecture hours = 2 credits)

    The course is designed to utilize the foundation acquired in CVM 731 (Basic Pharmacology) to understand and utilize data for specific drug classes as relates to their clinical utilities and limitations. Drug modes of action and physiologic effects that stem from drug actions are introduced with emphasis placed upon prototypical drugs.

     

    CVM 743 | Intro to Diagnostic Imaging

    (45 lecture hours = 3 credits)

    This introductory course covers methods of imaging, radiation safety measures and principles of image interpretation. Radiography and ultrasonography are emphasized, but computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear scintigraphy are also discussed. Lectures on basic image interpretation include normal findings and classical imaging signs of common conditions. A working knowledge of small animal and equine anatomy and physiology is a pre-requisite for this course.

     

    CVM 744 | One Health IV

    (15 lecture hours = 1 credit)

    This course introduces the basic concepts of the role environmental component of One Health.  This will include a broad analysis of environmental impacts of livestock production, climate change, food safety and security, emerging and transboundary diseases. These will be examined across a broad spectrum of ecosystems including air, land, fresh water, and oceans.  The links between the environment, human health and animal health will be highlighted including a focus on the Appalachian region.  Students will complete the USDA Emerging and Exotic Diseases of Animals for Initial Accreditation Training.

     

    CVM | 745 Clinical Skills IV

    (45 lab hours = 1.5 credits)

    Students will continue to develop expertise in handling and interpretation of general physical examination findings in large animals (equine, bovine, small ruminants). Students will demonstrate continued progress toward mastery of psychomotor skills for surgery including aseptic technique, anesthetic monitoring, and using a spay model.

     

    CVM 746 | Introduction to Anesthesia & Analgesia I

    (30 lecture hours = 2 credits)

    This course serves as an introduction to veterinary anesthesia, analgesia, and peri-operative case management.  It will lay the foundation for the basic principles of anesthesia and analgesia, relying on the student to review and be familiar with basic pharmacology and physiology presented in previous semesters. This course is also a prerequisite for the Applications in Anesthesia & Analgesia course in the 5th semester of the curriculum, in which students will apply the knowledge learned in the introductory course to formulate specific anesthetic plans for various species and cases with pre-existing conditions or comorbidities.

     

    CVM 748 | Professional Skills IV

    (1 lectures + 28 lab hours = 1 credit) 

    Students will be introduced to professional communication skills and their importance in veterinary medicine. Students will be exposed to the following: Calgary Cambridge Guide to communication, Presenting to a clinician, Informed consent Crucial Accountability, Professional Communication via Telephone. Students will demonstrate these skills in simulated client interactions.

     

    CVM 749 | Integrated Diagnostics

    (15 lectures = 1 credit)

    This course is designed to help students develop their skills in critical thinking, communication, resource identification, evaluation, and clinical decision-making through small group management of a hypothetical veterinary cases. Through case-based learning, students will revisit and apply knowledge from previous courses as well as preview the application and interpretation of content from upcoming semesters. Students will maintain any and all appropriate medical records during the management of the case.

     

    CVM 764 | Veterinary Dentistry

    (15 lecture hours = 1 credit)

    Diagnosis, treatment, prognosis, and prevention of dental diseases of the dog, cat, horse, and exotic pets.

  •  Semester Four | Elective Courses

    CVM 769-C | Veterinary Oncology

    (15 lecture hours = 1 credit)

    This course teaches principles and practice of veterinary oncology.  Students will gain knowledge of the most common malignancies seen in both small and large animals, including both diagnosis and appropriate treatment options with their associated prognosis.  Information will be presented in both didactic and case-based format.

     

    CVM 769-D | Wildlife and Zoological Medicine

    (15 lecture hours = 1 credit)

    The purpose of this “Wildlife & Zoological Medicine” course is to introduce & expose veterinary students to the diversity of this discipline of veterinary medicine.  This course will expose the third-year student to species within the classes of mammalian, avian, reptilian, amphibian, and fish.  Each of these taxons represented include between 6000 to 20,000 species.   The representative species discussed and studied in this course will enable the veterinary student to gain a basic understanding of the unique challenges and requirements of medicine and surgery involving diverse species in ex situ locations within zoological parks and in situ within natural habitats or other environments.  Likewise, the veterinary student will learn that (s)he will not only broaden one’s knowledge and skill base, but also potentially increase one’s income capacity by providing professional care for these species. This “Wildlife & Zoological” (W & Z) course will build on the knowledge & skills the sixth semester veterinary student has developed over the previous five semesters.  This W & Z course will require a sound knowledge of parasitology, anatomy, physiology, general pathology, immunology, infectious diseases, and other disciplines of medicine and surgery.  The veterinary student will be expected to be able to adapt and modify their skill sets and knowledge base to adapt to the unique characteristics of these species of other taxons of the vertebrate phylum.

     

    CVM 769-G | Remote Delivery of Clinical Case Rounds

    (8 lectures = .5 credit) 

    This course is designed to help students develop their skills in critical thinking, communication and clinical decision-making skills.  This will be accomplished by working through small group management of hypothetical and real-life veterinary cases delivered online through remote delivery platforms such as Blackboard Collaborate, Yellow dig and Vetbloom.  This course will contain problem-based learning and students will revisit and apply knowledge from previous courses as well as preview the application and interpretation of content from upcoming semesters.  This course will be applicable for students across multiple years in the veterinary curriculum.  Students can take this course up to five times during semesters two through six of the veterinary curricula. First semester students will be able to audit this course for no credit. For this course to be held, a minimum of ten students is required.

     

    CVM 769-N | Interprofessional Teamwork in Global Health

    (15 Lectures = 1 Credit)

    This course in interprofessional education and practice is designed as a companion to the Shoulder-to-Shoulder Global Ecuador health brigade or other similar immersion experiences to provide students with an opportunity to work effectively as an interprofessional team in an international or other community setting to promote positive, holistic health outcomes for individuals and communities. Enrollment in this course requires acceptance to the Shoulder to Shoulder Global health brigade and permission of the course faculty.

Year Three

Fall 2020 - Spring 2021

  •  Semester Five

    CVM 750 | Small Animal Medicine I

    (60 lecture hours = 4 credits)

    Diagnosis, treatment, prognosis, and prevention of non-surgical diseases of the dog and cat. Emphasis will be on diagnosis and treatment. 

     

    CVM 751 | Theriogenology

    (30 lecture hours = 2 credits)

    Integration of reproductive physiology, endocrinology, pathology, and pharmacology as they apply to the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of reproductive disorders of domestic animals. Normal estrous cycles, breeding management, pregnancy, dystocia management and parturition in domestic animal species will be covered.  Breeding soundness in male and female animals, and normal pregnancy and production.

     

    CVM 752 | Food Animal Production, Medicine, & Surgery I

    (45 lecture hours = 3 credits)

    This course is designed to educate the veterinary student on the diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and prevention of non-surgical and surgical disease of food and fiber animals (bovine, ovine, caprine, porcine, camelid) and includes production animal medicine and emerging diseases.

     

    CVM 753 | Equine Medicine & Surgery I

    (45 lecture hours = 3 credits)

    Clinical conditions seen in the horse, with emphasis on clinical signs, diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment, and prognosis.

     

    CVM 754 | One Health V-Global One Health

    (15 lecture hours = 1 credit)

    This course will introduce the concepts of global veterinary medicine, global drivers of change, the role of AVMA, US government, the United Nations, Non-governmental organizations (NGOs), private volunteer organizations (PVOs) in One Health. The course will examine the One Health aspects of global medicine including social, political, economic, legal, religious, and other components. The course will explore current and future career opportunities in global veterinary medicine.

     

    CVM 755 | Clinical Skills V

    (60 lab hours = 2 credits)

    Continued development of expertise in handling and interpretation of general and specific physical examination findings in large animals (equine, bovine, small ruminants) and small animals. Continuation of anesthesia and surgical skills training with introduction of anesthesia and surgery in the live canine or feline patient.

     

    CVM 758 | Professional Skills V

    (30 lab hours = 1 credit)

    Students will be introduced & exposed to advanced professional communication skills and their importance in veterinary medicine. Students will be exposed to advanced skills the Calgary Cambridge Guide as well as difficult conversations for client consultation and key components to support it. Students will demonstrate these skills in simulated client interactions.

  •  Semester Five | Elective Courses

    CVM 769-L | Theriogenology Elective

    (15 lecture hours + 15 lab hours = 1.5 credit)

    Advanced integration of reproductive physiology, endocrinology, pathology, and pharmacology as they apply to the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of reproductive disorders of large animal species.  Advanced normal and abnormal estrous cycles, breeding management, pregnancy, dystocia management, parturition, synchronization protocols, assisted reproductive techniques (embryo transfer, ovum pick-up, in vitro fertilization, intracytoplasmic sperm injection, etc.), and additional reproductive pharmacologic agents in large animal species will be covered.  Advanced breeding soundness in male and female animals, and normal, abnormal pregnancy and production, and advanced procedures.  Advanced topics will have a more in-depth view of the reproductive health and treatment of large animal species.

  •  Semester Six

    CVM 756 | Anesthesia and Analgesia II

    (7 lecture hours = .5 credits)

    This course serves as the application of the knowledge gained in the introduction to veterinary anesthesia and analgesia course.  The focus will be on the peri-operative case management for a patient with co-existing disease(s). This course will require the student to learn both independently and within a group dynamic, by focused reading assignments, case studies, and a group presentation at the end of the course.

     

    CVM 760 | Small Animal Medicine II

    (60 lecture hours = 4 credits)

    Diagnosis, treatment, prognosis, and prevention of non-surgical diseases of the dog and cat. Emphasis will be on diagnosis and treatment. 

     

    CVM 761 | Avian and Exotic Animal Medicine

    (15 lecture hours = 1 credit)

    The purpose of this “Avian & Exotic Animal Medicine” course is to build confidence, competence, and commitment to the species of small, “exotic” mammalian, avian, and reptilian species that are most commonly presented to clinicians in North American practices.  Each of these three taxons represented include between 6000 to 8000 species.   The representative species discussed and studied in this basic medicine course will enable the veterinary student to gain a basic understanding of the unique challenges and requirements of these increasingly popular, companion animals.  Likewise, the veterinary student will learn that (s)he will not only broaden one’s knowledge and skill base, but also potentially increase one’s income capacity by provided professional care for these species. This “Avian & Exotics” (A&E) course will build on the knowledge & skills the sixth semester veterinary student has developed over the previous five semesters.   This A & E course will require a sound knowledge of parasitology, anatomy, physiology, general pathology, immunology, infectious diseases, and other disciplines of medicine and surgery.  The veterinary student will be expected to be able to adapt and modify their skill sets and knowledge base to adapt to the unique characteristics of these species of other taxons of the vertebrate phylum.

     

    CVM 762 | Food Animal Production, Medicine, & Surgery II

    (45 lecture hours = 3 credits)

    This course is designed to educate the veterinary student on the diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and prevention of non-surgical and surgical disease of food and fiber animals (bovine, ovine, caprine, porcine, camelid) and includes production animal medicine and emerging diseases.  

     

    CVM 763 | Equine Medicine & Surgery II

    (45 lecture hours = 3 credits)

    This course is designed to educate the veterinary student on clinical conditions seen in the horse, with emphasis on clinical signs, diagnosis, medical, and surgical treatment, and prognosis.

     

    CVM 765 | Clinical Skills VI

    (105 lab hours = 3.5 credits)

    Students will be introduced to more advanced diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for small and large animals including ophthalmology procedures, ultrasonography, radiography, bandaging, semen evaluation, and epidurals using a combination of live animals, models and cadavers. Students will demonstrate continued practice with completing medical records including SOAPs, case presentations, and discharge instructions.

     

    CVM 766 | Introduction to Practice Management

    (15 lecture hours = 1 credit)

    *Course description under construction*

     

    CVM 767 | Small Animal Surgery IV Orthopedic

    (22 lecture hours = 1.5 credit)

    This course will cover orthopedic and other clinical conditions seen in small animals with an emphasis on surgical treatment and prognosis.  It will integrate and build upon the principles of surgery and surgical diseases covered in CVM 737, 747, and CVM 757, applying and expanding anatomical knowledge acquired, and go beyond the genetic and developmental aspects of small animal orthopedic and other clinical conditions to address surgical interventions to consider when conservative and medical therapies alone are not appropriate or not producing satisfactory results.  Case-based learning will be utilized throughout the course to improve students’ ability to apply the information to real-world practical clinical situations.

     

    CVM 768 | Professional Skills VI

    (15 lab hours = 1 credit)

    Students will be introduced to professional communication skills and their importance in veterinary medicine. Students will be exposed to the following: Calgary Cambridge Guide to communication, Presenting to a clinician, Informed consent Crucial Accountability, Professional Communication via Telephone. Students will demonstrate these skills in simulated client interactions.

  •  Semester Six | Elective Courses

    CVM 769-F | Critical Patient Management

    (12 lecture hours + 6 lab hours = 1 credit)

    This course introduces or expands upon critical care topics and techniques.  Students will gain a greater depth of knowledge of the topics and apply this information during hands-on laboratory sessions.  An emphasis will be placed on the individual student to prepare in advance for the lectures and labs, by reading assigned material and completing laboratory assignments. A group project will be presented by the students at the end of the course.

     

    CVM 769-G | Remote Delivery of Clinical Case Rounds

    (8 lectures = .5 credit)  

    This course is designed to help students develop their skills in critical thinking, communication and clinical decision-making skills.  This will be accomplished by working through small group management of hypothetical and real-life veterinary cases delivered online through remote delivery platforms such as Blackboard Collaborate, Yellow dig and Vetbloom.  This course will contain problem-based learning and students will revisit and apply knowledge from previous courses as well as preview the application and interpretation of content from upcoming semesters.  This course will be applicable for students across multiple years in the veterinary curriculum.  Students are able to take this course up to five times during semesters two through six of the veterinary curricula. First semester students will be able to audit this course for no credit. For this course to be held, a minimum of ten students is required.

     

    CVM 769-H | Advanced Equine Diagnostics

    (30 Lab hours = 1 Credit)

    This course expands on principles introduced in the CVM 753, 763 (Equine Medicine and Surgery), CVM 715, 725, 735, 745, 755, and 765 (Clinical skills), and other courses taught in the LMU-CVM curriculum. Students will learn to use advanced diagnostic procedures and techniques commonly applied in equine medicine, surgery, and theriogenology. This course is particularly recommended for equine oriented students before the beginning of their clinical year rotation. The course is designed to allow students to become competent and confident in using several the diagnostic procedures and techniques encountered in equine practice. An emphasis will be placed on the individual student to prepare in advance for the labs, by reading assigned material and completing laboratory assignments.

     

    CVM769-K | Food Animal Elective

    (30 Lab hours = 1 Credit)

    This course is designed to increase expertise in certain food animal skills, expose food animal students to techniques and skills not previously taught in prior courses or labs and offers opportunity to increase their food animal problem solving and critical thinking skills.  This course is primarily directed toward students that wish to specialize in food animal practice or intend for food animal practice to be most of their overall practice.  Dairy, beef and small ruminants’ topics and exercises will be conducted and will include at least one “outbreak” investigation.

     

    CVM 769-N | Interprofessional Teamwork in Global Health

    (15 Lectures = 1 Credit)

    This course in interprofessional education and practice is designed as a companion to the Shoulder-to-Shoulder Global Ecuador health brigade or other similar immersion experiences to provide students with an opportunity to work effectively as an interprofessional team in an international or other community setting to promote positive, holistic health outcomes for individuals and communities. Enrollment in this course requires acceptance to the Shoulder to Shoulder Global health brigade and permission of the course faculty.

Year Four

FALL 2020 - SPRING 2021

  •  Semesters Seven and Eight | Required Courses

    CVM 770 | Small Animal General Practice

    (4 weeks = 4 credits)

    Course CVM 770 consists of supervised clinical instruction in a selected, pre-approved, high quality, small animal general practice (canine, feline, pocket pets). Students see a wide variety of medical and surgical cases and are active participants in their diagnostic and therapeutic management, to include documentation of findings and care in problem-oriented medical records and performance of clinical procedures.

     

    CVM 771 a-b | Specialty Practice Clinical Rotation

    (4 weeks = 4 credits)

    Course CVM 771 consists of supervised clinical instruction in a selected, high quality, specialty practice focusing on small animal species, primarily canine and feline. Instruction will take place in practices with board certified internists, radiologists, surgeons, anesthesiologists, or other specialists, and/or access to those specialists. Students are active participants in diagnostic and therapeutic management of a wide variety of cases with instructive pathophysiological learning issues requiring appropriate medical and/or surgical management in veterinary advanced care, emergency and critical care situations.

    Or

    CVM 771S | Specialty Practice Clinical Rotation “Selective”

    (4 weeks = 4 credits)

    Course CVM 771S consists of supervised clinical instruction in a selected, high quality, specialty practice. Species of focus or interest can include: canine, feline, lab animal, exotic, zoological, equine and/or large animal depending on the interest and career goals of the student. Instruction will take place in practices with board certified internists, radiologists, surgeons, anesthesiologists, or other specialists, and/or access to those specialists. Students are active participants in diagnostic and therapeutic management of a wide variety of cases with instructive pathophysiological learning issues requiring appropriate medical and/or surgical management in veterinary advanced care, emergency and critical care situations.

     

    CVM 772 | Small Animal Primary Care

    (4 weeks = 4 credits)

    Course CVM 772 consists of supervised clinical instruction in the medical and surgical areas of a busy community shelter practice. Students will receive an introduction to all aspects of shelter operations and gain a better understanding of the challenges that animal shelters encounter. Students will learn why animals are admitted to shelters, behavior and enrichment strategies used in this environment, and how community engagement leads to successful adoptions.

     

    CVM 772 | Small Animal Primary Care - Virtual

    (4 weeks = 4 credits)

    Course CVM 772 consists of supervised instruction in the medical and surgical areas of a busy community shelter practice. Students will receive an introduction to all aspects of shelter operations and gain a better understanding of the challenges that animal shelters encounter. Students will learn why animals are admitted to shelters, behavior and enrichment strategies used in this environment, and how community engagement leads to successful adoptions.

    Veterinarians and other subject matter experts participating in the course will discuss  preventive, medical, and surgical care options for shelter animals with the students, including the review of  physical examinations, develop problem lists and determine differential diagnoses on shelter animals. After discussing their findings with a veterinarian, students will then formulate diagnostic and treatment plans for their patients. Students will develop surgical skills through learning about various techniques utilized in spay/neuter procedures. Students will gather patient history and perform animal examinations on client owned animals through simulated activities. Students may also have the opportunity to participate in discussions regarding dentistry procedures, and attend presentations by  humane officers.  Communication practice revolving around the care received at preventative health clinics will also be offered. Students may be required to make formal case presentations to others during the course. 

     

    The virtual CVM 772 course is composed of discussions regarding the medical and surgical care of animals, presentations, self-study, case write ups, and working with members of various shelter departments. 

     

    CVM 773 | Diagnostic Veterinary Medicine

    (2 weeks = 2 credits)

    The CVM 773 course is a 2-week rotation during which the students will receive senior level training in diagnostic pathology and 10 ancillary diagnostic services. The ancillary diagnostic services are; bacteriology, virology, molecular biology, serology, toxicology, clinical receiving, histology, parasitology, clinical pathology, and epidemiology. The course is composed of lecture/cooperative/ active /group and self- learning morning sessions. The students will spend the afternoon sessions performing post mortem examinations on the University of Kentucky Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory (UKVDL) necropsy floor or will work on Diagnostic Case Studies and allied diagnostic services assignments. The students will also give diagnostic pathology case presentations on UKVDL case submissions and will receive clinical pathology assignments. The clinical pathology assignments are composed of cytology slides collected from case submissions and the students are asked to read the slides using microscopes and submit their diagnostic reports. 

     

    CVM 773 | Diagnostic Veterinary Medicine - Virtual

    (2 weeks = 2 credits)

    The CVM 773 course is a 2-week rotation during which the students will receive senior level training in diagnostic pathology and 10 ancillary diagnostic services. The ancillary diagnostic services are; bacteriology, virology, molecular biology, serology, toxicology, clinical receiving, histology, parasitology, clinical pathology, and epidemiology. The course is composed of lecture/cooperative/ active /group and self- learning morning sessions. The students will spend the afternoon sessions observing post mortem examinations remotely on the University of Kentucky Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory (UKVDL) necropsy floor (with two way audio/video for Q&A) or will work on Diagnostic Case Studies and allied diagnostic services assignments. The students will deliver diagnostic pathology case presentations on case submissions and will receive clinical pathology assignments. The students read the slides that will be shared virtually, and will write and submit their diagnostic reports. 

     

    CVM 774 | Large Animal Rotation

    (4 weeks = 4 credits) 

    Students will be introduced to diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for large animals including internal medicine cases, bovine lameness, herd and flock health consultation and routine procedures, ophthalmology procedures, diagnostic imaging, equine lameness examination, reproductive technology, bandaging and wound care, dental procedures, anesthesia, and general surgical procedures using a combination of live animals, models, and cadavers. Students will demonstrate continued communications skills development including communication with owners through written discharge instructions and communication with colleagues via referral letters.

     

    CVM 774-B | Large Animal Equine Alternate Rotation

    (4 weeks = 4 credits)

    Students with a high interest in food animal and/or equine practice, who have demonstrated basic skills in the handling of these species, will be approved by members of LMU faculty to complete their large animal rotation at Secondary Instructional Sites (SIS) of high quality, as designated by the Clinical Relations and Outreach team, in lieu of completing their large animal rotation at the DVTC.  These locations will introduce and/or reinforce diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for large animals including internal medicine cases, bovine lameness, herd and flock health consultation and routine procedures, ophthalmology procedures, diagnostic imaging, equine lameness examination, reproductive technology, bandaging and wound care, dental procedures, anesthesia, and general surgical procedures using a combination of live animals, models, and cadavers. Students will demonstrate continued communications skills development including communication with owners through written discharge instructions and communication with colleagues via referral letters. 

    CVM 774 | Large Animal Rotation -  Virtual

    (4 weeks = 4 credits)

    Students will be introduced to diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for large animals in a virtual environment including internal medicine cases, bovine lameness, herd and flock health consultation and routine procedures, ophthalmology procedures, diagnostic imaging, equine lameness examination, reproductive technology, bandaging and wound care, dental procedures, anesthesia, and general surgical procedures using a combination of live animals, models, and cadavers. Students will demonstrate continued communications skills development including communication with faculty through exercises demonstrating written discharge instructions and communication with colleagues via referral letters. 

     

    CVM 776 | NAVLE Administration (Off)

    (3 weeks = 3 credits)

    Course CVM 776 is a Required Course offered in fall semester. Students will prepare and sit for the North American Veterinary Licensing Exam (NAVLE®). Students will conduct independent studies and review in order to prepare for the NAVLE® by completing 80% of an approved NAVLE prep course. Students will take the NAVLE® at the location that they applied for during the summer June-August application window.

     

    CVM 777 | Clinical Year Assessment (Spring semester only)

    (1 week = 1 credit)

    Course CVM 777 is a Required Course offered in the spring semester, after rotations are completed and prior to commencement. Students will return to the LMU campus for a debriefing of their clinical year experience. Students will share clinical year experiences with other students and faculty. Topics of interest to the graduating veterinarian will be discussed and explored including: completing various surveys, financial aid separation, debt repayment methods and commencement celebration.

     

    CVM 778 | Clinical Diagnostic Imaging Hosted by VetCT

    (2 weeks = 2 credits)

    This course will provide a structured means for students in the clinical year of the DVM program to apply and synthesize the knowledge gained in the pre clinical training into the clinical setting.  Students will use the knowledge and skills gained in the Radiology Short Course to perform radiographic interpretation during their clinical placements.   

     

    Pre-requisites:  Successful completion of years 1-3 of the DVM program.  Understanding  and familiarity with the materials covered in CVM 743 is mandatory.

  •  Semesters Seven and Eight | Elective Courses

    CVM 775 | Mixed Animal Practice Clinical Rotation

    (4 weeks = 4 credits)

    Course CVM 775 consists of supervised clinical instruction in a selected mixed animal practice (canine, feline, beef, dairy, equine, small ruminants, swine). Students are active participants in diagnostic and therapeutic management of a wide variety of cases with instructive pathophysiological learning issues requiring appropriate medical and/or surgical management in veterinary care and emergency situations. 

     

    CVM 780 | Elective Distributive Courses

    (4 weeks = 4 credits)

    Course CVM 780 consists of supervised clinical instruction in high quality learning experiences available at institutions and practices in North America and around the world, to include specialty practices (such as medicine, surgery, cardiology, dermatology, neurology, oncology, ophthalmology), species-specific practices, other accredited Colleges of Veterinary Medicine, zoos, and other LMU-CVM approved public and private biomedical institutions. Students are active participants in their elective rotations, participating in the wide variety of cases with instructive learning issues and situations they will be exposed to. Elective clinical rotations can either be selected from a preapproved list or a proposal can submitted and approved through the Clinical Relations Office on E*Value.

     

    CVM 780-V| Virtual Elective Distributive Courses

    (4 weeks = 4 credits)

    CVM 780v consists of supervised clinical instruction in high quality learning environments. Students are active participants in this elective rotation, with access to a wide variety of cases that have robust learning opportunities and interactive scenarios which they will be expected to work through as clinicians. Students will be exposed to a wide variety of medical and surgical cases and will be active participants in the diagnostic and therapeutic management of those cases.  This will include requirements involving documentation of findings and treatment plans in problem-oriented medical records, as well as performance of clinical procedures.  

    The virtual CVM 780v course is composed of asynchronous and real-time discussions regarding medical, surgical, and preventive care cases, self-study, case write-ups, and current event issues, such as virtual care/telehealth. 

    Prerequisite: successful completion of pre-clinical course work, clinical year standing. 

     

    CVM 781 | Elective Externship

    (4 weeks = 4 credits)

    Course CVM 781 consists of supervised clinical instruction in high quality learning experiences available at institutions and practices in North America and around the world, to include specialty practices (such as medicine, surgery, cardiology, dermatology, neurology, oncology, ophthalmology), species-specific practices, other accredited Colleges of Veterinary Medicine, zoos, and other LMU-CVM approved public and private biomedical institutions. Students are active participants in their rotations, participating in the wide variety of cases with instructive learning issues and situations they will be exposed to. Elective externship clinical rotations are submitted and approved through the Clinical Relations Office on E*Value.

     

    CVM 782-A0 | NAVLE Preparation Course

    (2 weeks = 2 credits)

    This course is offered to students in the fourth year of the curriculum as an elective to assist in preparation for the North American Veterinary Licensing Examination. Course design involves a multifaceted approach to content delivery through didactic lectures, review sessions, online educational resources/testing modules, and structured self-directed study. The process will allow the student to identify individual areas for improvement and plan a selection of reviews to customize an individual study plan. The course includes testing exercises of varying difficulty, including content and environment comparable board examination simulations. Students will have access to online educational materials and learning tools provided by the VetPrep or Zuku Review NAVLE® preparation program. Course director and instructors will track individual student progress and testing outcomes through analysis of performance metrics provided by the VetPrep or Zuku Review exam service. The course combines daily lectures and classroom exercises, content/topics organized by animal species and self-directed study periods spanning 2 weeks.

     

    CVM 782-B0 | Introduction to Canine Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation Elective

    (1 week = 1 credit, maximum enrollment 20)

    This special-topics course will cover the basic concepts of sports medicine, athletic conditioning, physical rehabilitation and integrative treatments in canines.  Students will be introduced to various therapeutic options to include acupuncture, chiropractic, laser therapy, therapeutic ultrasound, nutrition and nutraceuticals. A working knowledge of canine anatomy and physiology as well as canine medicine and surgery is a pre-requisite for this course.

     

    CVM 782-C0 | Equine Sports Medicine Elective

    (1 week = 1 credit)

    This special-topics course will cover the basic concepts of equine sports medicine, including exercise physiology, athletic conditioning, physical rehabilitation, advanced lameness evaluation, advanced performance evaluation, and integrative treatments. A working knowledge of equine anatomy and physiology as well as equine medicine and surgery is a pre-requisite for this course.

     

    CVM 782-D0 | Swine Production Medicine Elective

    (1 week = 1 credit)

    This introductory course covers the basics of clinical swine medicine with regard to the roles played by veterinarians in swine operations in implementing diagnostic, treatment and prevention plans and identifying production related risk factors that impact disease severity such as biosecurity, environment, pig flow and husbandry practices. An introduction the US swine industry with emphasis on topics that impact veterinarians will be presented. A basic understanding of common swine diseases is a pre-requisite for this course.

     

    CVM 782-E0 | Poultry Health Elective

    (1 week = 1 credit)

    This course teaches principles of Poultry Health. Students will gain knowledge of avian (poultry) clinical anatomy and physiology, nutrition, basic management, clinical signs of common diseases / disorders, generation of differential diagnoses lists, development of diagnostic plans, treatment, control, and prevention strategies. The course stresses critical thinking and problem solving.

     

    CVM 782-F0 | Beef Cattle Rural Practice Elective

    (1 week = 1 credits, minimum enrollment 4; maximum enrollment 8)

    This course will cover material that will enable students to develop and build the beef cattle aspect of a rural practice.

    Pre-requisites: food animal procedure elective

     

    CVM 782-H0 | Advanced Veterinary Dentistry Elective

    (1 week = 1 credit, maximum student enrollment 20)

    This elective course is a continuation of small animal dentistry and is focused on the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of common dental conditions of canine and feline patients which are typically seen in small animal general practice.

     

    CVM 782-I0 | Integrative Medicine Elective

    (1 week = 1 credit, maximum student enrollment 15)

    This course is a 1 credit hour elective that will introduce fourth year veterinary students to common components of integrative medicine practice. Integrative medicine options in both small and large animals will be discussed.

     

    CVM 782-J | Applied Veterinary Business Elective

    (2 weeks = 2 credits, maximum student enrollment 10)

    Designed for students considering practice ownership or seeking to add value as a standout associate veterinarian, this hands-on, management-oriented externship offers a unique and valuable experience. The externship will focus on four primary pillars:

    1. Hospital Financial Statements: How to Drive Change in Revenue & Expenses
    2. Leadership and Cultural Influence: The Art of Investing in People
    3. Building a Successful Team through Staff Leverage and Communication
    4. Client Recruitment & Retention: How to Define, Capture and Retain your Ideal Client

     

    CVM 782-K | Introduction to Veterinary Academia Elective

    (1 week = 1 credit)

    This course is designed to introduce fourth year veterinary students to veterinary academia.  It will provide insights into the daily workings of an academic institution, opportunities for students to attend planning meetings, have conversations with and shadow various faculty and staff members, gain a better understanding of what opportunities exist in veterinary academia and how they can prepare themselves for engaging in this type of career post-graduation.

     

    CVM 782-L0 | Clinical Case Presentations and Reasoning Elective

    (1 week = 1 credit, maximum enrollment 30)

    This course is designed to help students develop their skills in critical thinking, communication and clinical decision-making skills. This will be accomplished by working through small group management of hypothetical and real-life veterinary cases delivered online through remote delivery platforms and classroom-based discussions and presentations. This course will contain problem-based learning and students will revisit and apply knowledge from previous courses as well as preview the application and interpretation of content from upcoming semesters. This course is available for any fourth-year student. There may be some repetition of material and concepts from the CVM 769-G elective. For this course to be held, a minimum of ten students is required and registration is limited to 30 students.

     

    CVM 782-M0 | Nutritional Management of Small Animal Diseases Elective

    (1 week = 1 credit, minimum enrollment 10)

    This course is an introduction to clinical nutrition that will cover recognition and management of common diseases of dogs and cats in which proper diet and nutrition play important roles.

     

    CVM 783 | DVTC Small Animal Elective

    (4 weeks = 4 credits)

    Students will be introduced to more advanced diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for small animals including ophthalmology procedures, diagnostic imaging, bandaging and wound care, dental procedures, anesthesia, and general surgical procedures using a combination of live animals, models, and cadavers. Students will demonstrate continued communications skills development including communication with owners through oral histories and written discharge instructions and communication with colleagues via referral letters.

     

    CVM 784 | DVTC Theriogenology Elective

    (4 weeks = 4 credits)

    Students will be introduced to advanced theriogenology techniques and theories including, but not limited to advanced rectal palpation, breeding management, AI, embryo flushing/handling, twin reduction methods in horses, advanced pregnancy ultrasound including fetal sexing, semen collection, semen freezing, semen shipping, advanced semen evaluation, and advanced male evaluation. Students will demonstrate continued communications skills development including communication with owners through written discharge instructions and communication with colleagues via referral letters.

     

    CVM 785 | Rural Practice Workshop Elective

    (6 weeks = .5 credit)

    The Rural Practice Workshop supports the LMU and CAHA mission of improving animal and human health in Appalachia and addressing the rural veterinary shortage throughout Appalachia.  Students interested in rural practice will gain additional knowledge about practice management, helpful reference resources, skills for working successfully in rural Appalachia, and mentorship.  The program consists of 6 webinars that are remotely accessible by participating students.  Webinar speakers will include members from LMU-CVM’s faculty with experience in rural practice ownership and logistics. Speakers will also include veterinarians that are currently practicing in rural Appalachia, professional consultants, and representatives from prominent veterinary supply distributors. All courses are required unless indicated as an elective course.